“Shithole” in Argie Spanish

There are 11 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by Carlos.

  • I wanted to know how to say it.

    At first everyone I asked said it is “lugar de mierda.” But that’s wrong, in terms of how it is used: technically, it means something similar, but it’s not really used, and lacks the oomph and power that “shithole” has.

    Then they suggested “antro” but that has a criminal, underworld, you’re-an-evil-person-if-you’re-there connotation that “shithole” doesn’t have.

    So after much discussion, we think we found the right word..... drum roll, please..... basurero.

    Just wanted to share.


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  • I've always heard "basurero" used in the context of garbage collector. Word Reference says it can also mean garbage dump, so I suppose that's possible.


    I suggested "pozo de mierda" to keep the disgusting context of "shithole." I think it's more descriptive because "basurero," in the sense of garbage dump, isn't broad enough. "Shithole" doesn't just imply dirt and filth: it pretty much lands an overall assessment of a place as one in which nothing is good, nothing works, nothing of value can be found, and you just don't want to go there. My opinion only, and worth the word power it takes to expound it.

  • Not meaning to hijack this thread, but just a little historical side trip --


    I read today that the US owes Haiti not only an apology, but an enormous thank-you as well. It was largely due to Haiti's successful slave revolt that Napoleon found his country with empty pockets. Thus Thomas Jefferson was able to pay France the pittance of $15 million for the entire Louisiana Territory, which doubled the size of the US in 1803.


    So thank you, valiant people of the formerly French trou de merde!

  • On Clarín there is an article on how shithole countries was translated on Spanish-speaking medias around the world.


    While Clarín uses 'países de mierda' in this article, it also says that in Peru they went for 'agujeros de porquería' and in México 'países de mierda' (and so did Brazilians in Portuguese). Some African countries went for 'países sucios'


    This is an Italian take on the subject, for those who speak the language.

  • On Clarín there is an article on how shithole countries was translated on Spanish-speaking medias around the world.


    While Clarín uses 'países de mierda' in this article, it also says that in Peru they went for 'agujeros de porquería' and in México 'países de mierda' (and so did Brazilians in Portuguese). Some African countries went for 'países sucios'


    This is an Italian take on the subject, for those who speak the language.

    OMG, that Terminologia Inc article is the best one yet! Even without speaking Italian, I could get the gist of it, and it was hilarious to see this subject treated so academically, even in the comments. Straight-faces dissection and analysis of the subject at hand. Loved the cartoons, the graph, the side trips to "mud hole" and "hell hole." But it was that anagram that very nearly made me break some ribs.

  • However the bolivians here have a good reputation for being hard workers. All the construction crew has several bolivians inside. I worked as an architect with bolivians and I have not any claim against them. Very good workers and very gentle, and show respect to their supervisors, as I was indeed.

    The same accusation was made in the last part of the XIX century to the italians, who made all the bridges, embankments and railway stations ruled by English architects and technicians. And this is utterly apparent in the magnificent works going along our railways.

    It is very easy to criticize the "sweat" inmigrants, as they do not look as white collars employees, and are also poor. It is not gallant nor fair to hit the weaker ones.

  • However the bolivians here have a good reputation for being hard workers. All the construction crew has several bolivians inside. I worked as an architect with bolivians and I have not any claim against them. Very good workers and very gentle, and show respect to their supervisors, as I was indeed.

    The same accusation was made in the last part of the XIX century to the italians, who made all the bridges, embankments and railway stations ruled by English architects and technicians. And this is utterly apparent in the magnificent works going along our railways.

    It is very easy to criticize the "sweat" inmigrants, as they do not look as white collars employees, and are also poor. It is not gallant nor fair to hit the weaker ones.

    I agree completely, but my experience is many people here do not share your respect.

  • I always admired the words of Winston Churchill, who said "At War, Resolution; at defeat, Dignity; at Victory, Magnificence"


    I think that those "many people" you quoted, and I know perfectly that there are here, lacks "magnificence". A term that needs to have a gentelmanly education to acknowledge its full meaning. For the majority, "magnificence" means only lavishness.