• Sounds like an underlying medical problem, but it's actually All The Gear All The Time which, in this tropical weather is easier said than done. I haven't yet reduced myself to flip-flops, tee-shirt and shorts when on the bike, but it's a common sight around here.

    Jeans, tee-shirt, boots and protective jacket at all times for me, even if it's a little uncomfortable. I leave the gloves off though, which is my only concession, depending on the journey.

  • Sounds like an underlying medical problem, but it's actually All The Gear All The Time which, in this tropical weather is easier said than done. I haven't yet reduced myself to flip-flops, tee-shirt and shorts when on the bike, but it's a common sight around here.

    Jeans, tee-shirt, boots and protective jacket at all times for me, even if it's a little uncomfortable. I leave the gloves off though, which is my only concession, depending on the journey.

    It's a pretty simple equation: reach down, press hard, and run your fingers across the asphalt. Then imagine your shorts-and-tee-shirted body, and your flipflopped feet doing the same at 100km/hr.

  • I finally bought a decent pair of gloves today, what with this cold weather.

    When I first started riding about ten years ago, I bought basic gloves and soon learned that you get what you pay for, as my hands would be frozen most of the time in winter.

    Then I bought a more high quality pair, but even with those I had to use a glove within a glove to keep relatively warm. It doesn't get terribly cold here, but when you add wind chill to 10c at 100Kmh, you really feel it in your fingertips.

    Well those gloves lasted very well and I replaced them last year, but on the cheap, so my fingers have been permanently frozen when riding in this weather, even with second skin gloves inside.

    Today I bought a pair of Rev'it! all weather Goretex/leather gloves and the difference is night and day. My fingers were pretty icy by the time I arrived at the bike shop in Tigre (only about 30 minutes away), then I bought the gloves and by the time I got home, my hands were nice and toasty and I didn't want to take the gloves off.

    They've also got a handy rubber visor wiper on the left forefinger for when it rains, which is a really clever addition. I expect I'll give them a proper test on Panamerican/R9 maybe tomorrow to see what they're really made of.


          

  • Naked man would have had no protection at all!


    Seriously Splinter, with that kind of over the car flying somersault landing, would all manner of protective clothing have saved a biker’s life? A good jacket would have kept his skin on, but the broken back and internal bleeding?

  • Naked man would have had no protection at all!


    Seriously Splinter, with that kind of over the car flying somersault landing, would all manner of protective clothing have saved a biker’s life? A good jacket would have kept his skin on, but the broken back and internal bleeding?

    In this case you may be right, although we will never know. However, safety gear can protect you from some nasty spills.


    In my younger days when I used to go on the mountain on my scrambler (dirt bike for my American friends) I hit a boulder similar to how this guy went into that car. I flipped over the bars and down an embankment landing on my back atop a flat boulder down below. I had the proper scrambler gear on and walked away with a sore back. Laying on that boulder I could not stop laughing.


    Sure, these things can often come down to luck but the safety gear pushes the odds further away from the Grim Reaper.

  • Ugh. There are so many terrible drivers out there - - talking, texting, eating rather than watching where they are going.

    From a bike's view you get to see what people are doing in their cars - if the windows aren't too blacked out - and I can say quite honestly that about 60-80% of drivers are looking at their phones whilst they drive.

    It's also true that most drivers don't look before they pull out at junctions and side streets and they will overtake a bike just for those few yards of space even if they don't need to.

    On motorways you need to be aware of people switching lanes very, very quickly. Either because they almost missed the exit or they are just being knobs.

    Many drivers also treat normal two way streets as one way, so I can come around a corner on the bike to face two cars head-on, so the only way I've found to survive is to go with the flow and anticipate all the f**ing time.

  • About ten years ago I insisted on getting a motorcycle license. My idea was that ONE DAY we could go on vacation on some island where the only allowed engine vehicles have two wheels, and with such a driving license we could hire one powerful enough for two people.

    I had a moped when I was a teen, but riding a bike was a different thing.

    The hardest part was being able to find someone to lend me a bike, teach me to drive and come with me at the practical exam.


    Somehow I managed to do it all with the help of two colleagues: one put the bike, and the other one taught me to drive. I also passed the exam at the first attempt and I was SO happy, as the bike was very heavy and the exam consisted in driving around an '8' staying inside cones. The bike was too heavy and big for such narrow turns, but it was a miracle someone lent me a bike!


    My husband also decided to get the license with me, but he fell during the exam's practice round (during the '8'). Eventually, he passed it. However, I was scared to death just to ride on paved road because of the gravel and the other vehicles. I couldn't help but think about the images I used to lurk on Rotten. <X


    When I moved here I had to redo my license all over, and I didn't bother to get a motorcycle license. I have a regular car license, and that's enough for me.


    I loved the feeling of freedom riding on a bike, but the many cautions and tales made me think that life is too short to risk it on a bike.

    The same is true for human-powered bicycles. They are great to ride, but too dangerous in the city.

  • I certainly feel safer on a motorbike than a bicycle. I found it a pretty scary experience riding a bicycle, mainly because it's harder to accelerate out of danger.

    That's true! There is very little one can do while riding a bicycle, except keep going, stop going, and steer.

    Motorbikes are a lot more fun to ride, too. It is almost as cool as flying - something I'd recommend you try, I did it with paragliding and another sport whose name I can't recall. Sort of paragliding but with an engine.


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  • It's so common here to see riders and passengers without helmets on I have to assume it's either not compulsory to wear one or they know they won't be stopped. If adults want to increase their chance of fatal injury by not wearing one then so be it. Kids on the other hand have no choice and deserve more protection from the police.


    I've done a fair bit of cycling here and always felt safe. You do have to ride sensibly though which many cyclists don't.