For UK Man and fans of The Great British Bake Off

  • This sweet recipe is from an alum of The Great British Bake off, the charming Edd Kimber. In his book One Tin Bakes he tells the unusual and as it turns out, controversial story of the origin of the beloved Anzac biscuit. You get a little history lesson about WWI and then, you get an amazing bar recipe, his Anzac Caramel Chocolate Slices.


    Anzac Caramel
 Chocolate Slices

    Anzac Cookies? Love them! Millionaire’s Shortbread? Grew up eating them. But what happens when you mash the two together? Utterly wonderful, joyous things, that’s what. When making the caramel, ignore your phone for a minute; Instagram® can wait, the caramel needs your total and undivided attention. Anzac cookies, if you haven’t come across them, are Antipodean favourites originally made to raise money to support the war effort in the First World War.

    Ingredients:

    For the Anzac base

    85g (3oz / 2/3 cup) plain (all-purpose) flour

    60g (2 1/4 oz / 3/4 cup) rolled oats

    40g (1 1/2 oz / 1/2 cup) desiccated coconut

    1/4 teaspoon flaked sea salt

    75g (2 3/4 oz / 2/3 stick) unsalted butter

    2 tablespoons golden syrup or clear honey

    100g (3 1/2 oz / 1/2 cup and 2 teaspoons)

    light brown sugar

    1/4 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda

    For the caramel filling

    150g (5 1/2 oz / 1 1/3 sticks)

    unsalted butter

    397g (14oz) can condensed milk

    3 tablespoons golden syrup or

    clear honey

    110g (4oz / 1/2 cup) light brown sugar

    For the topping

    200g (7oz) dark chocolate, melted

    flaked sea salt, for sprinkling (optional)

    Preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F), Gas Mark 4. Line the baking tin with a piece of parchment paper that overhangs the two long sides of the tin, securing in place with metal clips.

    To make the base, combine the flour, oats, coconut and salt in a large bowl. Place the butter, golden syrup or honey and sugar in a saucepan and cook over a medium heat, stirring every now and then, until melted. Remove from the heat and add the bicarbonate of soda and 1 tablespoon of water, stirring together for a minute until the mixture is a little foamy. Pour this over the oat mixture and mix together until well combined. While the Anzac mixture is still warm, tip it into the prepared tin and press into a flat and even layer.

    Bake for 20–25 minutes, or until golden brown and a little darker around the edges. Leave to cool in the tin while you make the caramel.

    Add all the caramel filling ingredients to a medium-sized saucepan and cook, stirring constantly, until the mixture comes to a simmer. Reduce the heat to low and continue to stir, scraping the bottom of the pan regularly to prevent catching, for 10–15 minutes, until the mixture has thickened and darkened a shade or two. Remove from the heat and

    pour the caramel over the base. This mixture is very hot, so ease it into the corners by lifting and tilting the tin as needed. Set aside to cool for 30 minutes.

    For the topping, pour the melted chocolate over the caramel and use an offset spatula to spread it out evenly. Pop the tin in the refrigerator and leave for a couple of hours to allow everything to fully set (if you want to sprinkle with sea salt, allow the chocolate to turn a little tacky before sprinkling, otherwise it will sink into the chocolate).

    To serve, remove from the tin using the parchment paper and cut into squares. I keep these in the refrigerator, as the chocolate isn’t tempered, but I allow them to come to room temperature before serving as the textures are at their best.

    Store in a sealed container for 4–5 days.

    Reprinted with permission from One Tin Bakes. Copyright © 2020 by Edd Kimber. Published by Kyle Books.

  • With all the weight I have gained during these months, I should hold off on any baking spree. :rolleyes:

    I've put on a wee bit of weight as well during the last few months. Not sure if it's been caused through consuming more food, booze or just sitting about more doing bugger all!!

  • I was okay for the first three months, but then I started giving myself too many concessions and consolation food. Combined with lack of physical activity, all my jeans shrunk... ^^

  • That’s a really positive way to think of it! Now that you mention it, I have suspected that a clever thief has slipped into my closet, stealing all my jeans. I say “clever” because, to avoid detection, the thief replaced my jeans with ones that are identical, but smaller.

  • I met the wife of a biker friend of mine on Saturday and simply couldn't believe how she looked. I last saw her about four years ago when she must have weighed about 80kg, but now is about 45kg.

    I was astounded and she looked fabulous, actually. However, I didn't feel it was right to ask her about her weight loss, apart from saying to her that she looked great.

    :facepalm:

  • I’d say you did the right thing. A friend and I were out walking on campus one afternoon when we ran across a professor friend, not known for tact. Mistaking my friend for someone else, he blurted out “The last time I saw you, your face was as big & round as the moon!”

  • Still weighing in at 90 kilos , the same as six months ago.


    The objective , however was to get down to 85/86 , which I haven't been able to do.

    I weigh in at 70kg have done for years. The scales were bought here right enough so how reliable they are must be in doubt. ^^


    Although no short arse I'm not that tall it has to be said.

  • I am 5ft 10 ins or 1.78m , according to your preference


    My target weight is 85kilos for January


    Given that I was 100 kilos about 5 years ago , I am fairly happy with the progress , although it is a wee bit too slow.

  • I am 5ft 10 ins or 1.78m , according to your preference


    My target weight is 85kilos for January


    Given that I was 100 kilos about 5 years ago , I am fairly happy with the progress , although it is a wee bit too slow.

    Think I'm about 5'8'' or at least I used to be......probably shrunk since coming here and becoming decrepit.


    Any idea what made you put on the weight? You've done well so far so all the best in losing the rest. :thumbup:

  • My husband is 5’9” and an insufferable 66 kg. During the pandemic he has eaten circles around me and still hasn’t gained an ounce.

    Genes is the reason. My parents and grandparents were mostly all slim. Despite what the missus may say I have always been an active person which also helps. Plus, although I don't always eat 'healthy' food I'm not a big eater.

  • We are very active and don’t eat a lot, either. OK, except for cookies during the pandemic, of course, but who is counting???


    But we do love our Malbec and Sauvignon Blanc. You don’t think that liquids can possibly carry calories, do you?

  • We are very active and don’t eat a lot, either. OK, except for cookies during the pandemic, of course, but who is counting???


    But we do love our Malbec and Sauvignon Blanc. You don’t think that liquids can possibly carry calories, do you?

    No point in having the perfect weight for your height if you end up being miserable attaining it.