Interesting take on workplace gender issues

There are 5 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by EJLarson.

  • Bob Lewis has been one of my favorite business writers for many years. His views on workplace issues usually have some insight that we (at least I) haven't considered. So here's one about gender issues in a technical (engineering) business and why they exist and what can be done.


    Do you agree with Bob, or not?


    http://issurvivor.com/2017/08/14/a-tale-of-two-genders/

  • Bob Lewis has been one of my favorite business writers for many years. His views on workplace issues usually have some insight that we (at least I) haven't considered. So here's one about gender issues in a technical (engineering) business and why they exist and what can be done.


    Do you agree with Bob, or not?


    http://issurvivor.com/2017/08/14/a-tale-of-two-genders/

    Lately I have had some spare time on my hands (read: Christmas) and spent some hours on Netflix. A good 5 hours were documentaries on fashion people, flamboyant figures, both males and females. However... designers are mostly male and outright gay. Females are 'fashion icons', models, magazine editors. Female fashion editors were quite sober. Well dressed, but not ridiculously dressed. Designers, on another account, were all queer.

    There is no place for straight males in fashion, apparently.


    Reading Bob's article... is IT predominated by male geeks because they are attracted to difficult subjects as a consequence of their lack of social skills? Or is IT discriminating against women? could easily translate to Is fashion predominated by gay male queers because they can be themselves in fashion, or is fashion discriminating against straight males?

  • Being a male geek who worked in the technical world for a looooong time, I can see his logic - but I'd never ascribe discrimination to any single cause. It's way too complicated to be reduced to that.


    However, I do like his twin explanations of why what seems to be discrimination against women in technical jobs could often be explained by shyness on the part of the males. "She's so attractive! If I approach her she'll probably reject me and I'll feel bad. So I won't like her!" Simplified greatly, but from my own workplace experiences (observing others, you understand) I can see that dynamic working against attractive women. On the other hand, he notes that the inverse is true for less-attractive women: "What if she hits on me? I'd better stay away." Shyness at the root of both cases.


    Your point, however, is right on target. Humans are just wired to cluster in groups and clans, and be suspicious or hostile to those not like themselves. Once a group reaches critical mass in their population (e.g., gay designers?), of course they'll discriminate against others.


    It's what we do.