There are 21 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by mariana da cruz.

  • La Nacion published a list of three recipes/places where to have Portobello mushrooms.

    Personally, oil, garlic, a tad of white whine, sauté and once done, salt, pepper and parsley... et voilá.

    Or simply fried. Yummy!


    But it is pretty boring that in Capital portobello and champignones are the only two options available.

    Sometimes, also girgolas, but I have seen them only twice in a gourmet fair.

    I wonder if in Patagonia there are wild mushrooms available. Maybe JAN can answer to my question!



    In order: girgolas, portobello and champignones.


    girgolas.jpg

    Portobello-Mushroom.png

    Champignons.jpg

  • ????

    U mean other Jan.....?

    If I would answer I would need to troll around.... because I have no idea!

  • In typical Argentine fashion mushrooms have disappeared from the supermarket shelves since my chicken and mushroom empanadas became a hit with my mother in law. In the UK i used to have them with a fry up but for me they work best in beef stews.

    Mushrooms with garlic is okay but the garlic does tend to overpower the taste of the mushroom.

  • To reduce the garlic power:

    1) Remove the sprout in the middle

    2) Cut the garlic clove in half and remove it once the oil has heated and the garlic released its aroma. Burnt garlic is disgusting, so better take it out before it is too late.

    3) cook it thoroughly


    The strongest form is fresh mashed garlic. Once I made garlic bread in an attempt to reproduce some Irish or British garlic bread recipe... it was delicious but we smelled like garlic for days!

    There like 3-4 garlic cloves for a 1 kg dough of bread. The garlic was mixed with parsley and salt, if I recall correctly.

    We banned that recipe after the first successful attempt.

  • Is garlic a big part of Argentines’ home cooking? It is integral in many Italian sauces, isn’t it? I don’t notice it very much in restaurant food.


    Thanks for the tips on removing its killer strength, serafina. That’s a really useful thing to know.

  • I knew about removing the sometimes green centre however I thought that was to get rid of bitterness rather than strength....I'm no chef though.


    I used to like garlic a lot but have gone right off it. Every time I enter the mother in laws house the place is reeking of it. As she's not supposed to have salt her carer puts garlic in everything to give it flavour.

    Last time I used garlic was the other day when I lightly rubbed my toast with it before slapping on some butter and sardines for my lunch time snack.

  • Love sardines, but I always think mustard rather than garlic butter. With that and your empanadas recipe, you sound like an adventurous cook.

  • Splinter

    Changed the title of the thread from “Mushroom” to “Mushrooms”.
  • Love sardines, but I always think mustard rather than garlic butter. With that and your empanadas recipe, you sound like an adventurous cook.

    Simple cook rather than adventurous. ^^


    I like the sardines in tomato sauce on buttered toast as well...with a dash of Lea and Perrins to spice it up. Must give the mustard a try. :thumbup:

  • OK, @serafinaalready had me thinking of mushrooms, and now you’ve added sardines to my drooling daydreaming, UK Man. It’s still a long way until lunchtime but now my stomach is begging for food.


    Sardines with mustard on saltines and sautéed mushrooms would do the trick quite nicely.

  • UK Man, you should join our party this year, and take charge of the catering. We will be able to eat something different for a change!

  • UK Man, you should join our party this year, and take charge of the catering. We will be able to eat something different for a change!

    Fish suppers...you don't even need cutlery to eat it. :thumbup: It'll have to be merluza instead of haddock though.

  • What about haggish? I am just curious to see if it is too odd for my palate.


    I imagine it as a sort of mix between geese salami and morcilla.

  • Isn’t haggis traditionally cooked in a sheep’s stomach? The oatmeal part sounds fine, but ?

    Something like that.

    I think it's the texture that puts most people off. The modern versions are much better in looks and taste especially the Marks & Spencer one. It's very nice.

  • Marks & Spencer’s food hall was where I went, as a student, to try some of your strange foods, like steak & kidney pie. I don’t think haggis was on offer there at that time. But I probably wouldn’t have had the, um, stomach to try it.

  • Hi guys! I used to order mush from sueño verde (http://www.s-verde.com.ar/index.php) not many places where to find variety of them but they might have fresh shitake and girgolas.

    cheers

    mariana

    Thanks, mariana da cruz . Is there a minimum quantity to order?

    I can do 1 kg, but no more than that. I don't like to have food sitting in the fridge for very long.