Argentinians like their lines!

There are 2 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by Carlos.

  • An article on La Nación today addresses the issues that older people are facing now that more and more companies are trying to digitalize their bills and payments.

    Apparently, a great deal of the population over 65 years old do not own a computer nor is interested in doing so.

    Many companies have announced that they will no longer snail mail paper bills for their utilities, and elder people are panicking. How will I know when I have to pay?


    The article also explain that most elders do not collect entirely their pension, instead they withdraw small sums over the month. And they like to do it at the teller's desk and not via ATMs. The journalist interviewed some elders and found out that there are two main reasons why elder are reluctant to interact with machine: 1) they are afradi of the consequences associated with pressing a button 2) they enjoy staying in line. Seriously.


    Contra lo que puede creerse, los jubilados no suelen hacer retiros totales de su cuenta, en la fecha de cobro, según el estudio de la UCA. En cambio, prefieren hacer retiros parciales, varias veces al mes. Van al banco, al menos, una vez por semana. Cuando les preguntaron por qué, se señalaron dos razones en igual de importancia: la primera es porque les da miedo usar el cajero, desconfianza. Miedo a apretar un botón y que "explote el mundo". La segunda razón, tan relevante como la primera, es que les gusta ir al banco.

    "A la gente mayor le gusta ir al banco, hacer la fila. Aunque cueste creerlo. Esta es una demanda de socialización no satisfecha que tienen los adultos mayores. Ir al banco una vez por semana, ir a pagar sus servicios, son actividades que tienen una importancia para ellos porque los hace sentirse productivos y los conecta con otras personas. Para ellos no es lo mismo pagar todo por Internet, o con tarjeta de débito, aunque tengan un descuento o un beneficio. Lo que están demandando es relacionarse con otros", explica Amadasi.

  • An article on La Nación today addresses the issues that older people are facing now that more and more companies are trying to digitalize their bills and payments.

    Apparently, a great deal of the population over 65 years old do not own a computer nor is interested in doing so.

    Many companies have announced that they will no longer snail mail paper bills for their utilities, and elder people are panicking. How will I know when I have to pay?


    The article also explain that most elders do not collect entirely their pension, instead they withdraw small sums over the month. And they like to do it at the teller's desk and not via ATMs. The journalist interviewed some elders and found out that there are two main reasons why elder are reluctant to interact with machine: 1) they are afradi of the consequences associated with pressing a button 2) they enjoy staying in line. Seriously.

    I think older people dislike change and distrust themselves to be able to successfully handle a transaction on a machine without screwing up -- and fear the consequences.


    With all because burglaries and armed robberies, I think it's a good idea not to withdraw the entire pension at once.

  • I understand that aged people, with nothing to do, making lines and going to the bank is an entertainment. And they do not like to use a computer because their time to learn something new had passed.

    But there are some aged people who do not want stay without activity and they like to do something new and even some work to increase their income. Pensions in this country are very low and aged people needs to survive with the help of their younger family.

    This extra work is very healthy because it obliges the person to be updated and increase their self esteem, especially when it seems that aged people are a burden for the mainstream.