Airports and immigration problems

There are 8 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by serafina.

  • Carrying on from the topic started in the Welcome Thread, last year when we went to England I checked in with a brand new UK passport which caused the clerk to put up a red flag since the passport clearly didn't show any entries or exits, being brand new.

    Fortunately I'd remembered to take my old passport and even my old dni booklet just in case.

    Lesson learned ages ago in Argentina: when in doubt, take every fucking thing!

  • Following the received instructions that I accept, I am copying my last post in the wrong place, regarding the problems that a visitor could have if he is overstaying his visit (90 days) as a tourist.


    Due to the present inmigration policies of Argentina, I assume that nothing happens if you have overstayed here. There are no records about when you arrive and when are uou levong the country. Perhaps there are, but nobody takes care of it.

    As an argentinean, if there are some tourists which overstayed the visit to the country, provided they come from Europe or USA, I am not concerned. The problem is when the inmigrants come from Paraguay, Bolivia, and Peru. They are always overstayed, and since it rules the wrong criteria of the "Patria Grande", they remain here tolerated by the authorities. Then those inmigrants apply for a "plan trabajar". (and they get it!)

    There is no reciprocity in the above mentioned countries, which by many "generous, open minded" of my countrymen accepts in a very light manner.

  • I agree. One time, a few years ago, I was departing from the US to Argentina in my last day of allowed stay period. The plane could not take off because of technical problems, and the flight was delayed for the next incoming day. We were lodged in an Hotel, out from the Airport.

    I was really concerned because I thought that this delay will appear in my entrance-departure file in the inmigration Office of the US, and this could be a reason to deny the next VISA that I would need to return to this country.

    I talked with an American friend telling my anguish about this possible problem: he told me that things were not so hard, and nobody will take notice of that and there will be no consequences.

    Fortunately there was not a problem, but I do not like to be again in such circumstances.

  • I agree. One time, a few years ago, I was departing from the US to Argentina in my last day of allowed stay period. The plane could not take off because of technical problems, and the flight was delayed for the next incoming day. We were lodged in an Hotel, out from the Airport.

    I was really concerned because I thought that this delay will appear in my entrance-departure file in the inmigration Office of the US, and this could be a reason to deny the next VISA that I would need to return to this country.

    I talked with an American friend telling my anguish about this possible problem: he told me that things were not so hard, and nobody will take notice of that and there will be no consequences.

    Fortunately there was not a problem, but I do not like to be again in such circumstances.

    Completely agree with you on this, Carlos . Unnecessary stress. When traveling with a 90-day visa, we now make sure we leave 2 extra days, just in case a flight is cancelled.

  • Re serafina


    The boat ticket/some form of cheaper proof of "onward/return travel" would have been good to know in advance.


    Actually, the guy at Avianca even suggested getting a bus ticket, but I was fucking panicking - my girlfriend freaked out as well. As a result, she bought the cheapest plane ticket she could find in an attempt to get me on the flight I had been rejected from. A $50 bus ticket would have been way nicer than the $500 plane ticket she bought, which didn't work anyway because the plane left before we could get everything squared away. D'oh.


    Definitely bought some lessons already.

  • Re serafina


    The boat ticket/some form of cheaper proof of "onward/return travel" would have been good to know in advance.

    Sorry for not mentioning it before. I assumed that when you said 'moving to Argentina' you did your due diligence.

    Some people bought a bus/boat ticket through their phone (there is free WiFi at every Argentinian airport - God bless them!) but still had to provide a printout on paper, which was harder (and more expensive) to get at the airport. This is of course if you have the time of purchasing the ticket and looking for a place that will print out your ticket and then check-in again.

  • A $50 bus ticket would have been way nicer than the $500 plane ticket she bought, which didn't work anyway because the plane left before we could get everything squared away.

    You know you can get a full refund if you cancel your place ticket within 24 hours, even if it is economy non-refundable, right?

    This is valid for US-issued tickets: https://www.transportation.gov…notice-24hour-reservation


    However, reports say that this is not always the case

    : https://www.cntraveler.com/sto…ncellation-rule-is-a-myth