Living the Argentinian tale - Tell us your stories!

There are 32 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by Rice.

  • Not sure if this is the adapter you are needing, but it is the only one I have ever used. Their may also be very different wiring codes between our countries.


    Hi daniel ,


    we have Type I sockets here, just like Australia, New Zealand, and China (don't ask me why...). Actually, the adapter I need is this one shown below, because the hollow part will ensure the ground contact with the schuko's metal brackets and the three prongs will keep the contact with the wall socket ground. Most adapter here are of two kinds: they either have three prongs but are not hollowed, or they are hollowed but just have two prongs. Luckily I have brought with me Schuko to 3-prongs Italian adapters, so I would just need the white adapter shown in the picture in my previous post.


    I know one shouldn't put in cascade several adapters, which is what I am doing right now.

    Rice , thank you for your generous offer. I don't think I need it from Amazon -- the issue is that it is too large and will prevent me from connecting another adapter in the other socket.

    european-schuko-to-australian-grounded-power-adapter-plug-1cc.jpg

  • I don't understand why 220v is delivered to the house and is then converted to 110v.

    Or have I got that wrong?

    Power Company, in my case Entergy, supplies 220 Volts to the meter. 220 Volts is then wired into the main breaker box, I then have 110 Volts on each leg of the main breaker. Or i can use, say a double 40 amp breaker to run my central AC unit, which requires 220 Volts. 110 volt circuits use either 15 amp or 20 amp breakers. Nothing is "converted" but their are step down transformers that will step the voltage down for household use.

  • I don't understand why 220v is delivered to the house and is then converted to 110v.

    Or have I got that wrong?


    I didn't know that! It might have to do that higher voltage power transmission lead to lower power loss, this is why we have high voltage power line for long distance and then down step it locally to medium or low voltage, depending on the need (medium voltage is for industries, low voltage for residential and office use).

  • I've never been a fan of messing about with anything electric even in the UK.

    Here even less so after seeing 'competent' electricians having no hesitation in using sticky tape to join live cables etc.

  • I've never been a fan of messing about with anything electric even in the UK.

    Here even less so after seeing 'competent' electricians having no hesitation in using sticky tape to join live cables etc.

    well now, THAT’S truly terrifying.

  • In theory yes but in practice.


    You will probably find the gas people are a little more serious...

    Our plumber - who is a very nice chap - fixes both our plumbing and gas problems. Not had any problem yet but I noticed he always tests his gas pipe jobs with a lighter flame to see if there are any leaks in the joints which kind of worries me. :D

  • We had a bloke do that recently and so I took cover elsewhere. I couldn't believe it.

    Confidence is definitely and Argentinian trait.


    We moved the boiler from the floor to the wall, the plumber did about 2 meters worth of plumbing inside of the wall. Then he started closing it with concrete and my husband said 'Don't you at least test your plumbing'? The plumber said no need to test, they are empty pipes, but I can do it if it makes you feel better.


    The same plumber did another piping, this time not outside of the wall behind the kitchen lower cabinets, to be able to install the dishwasher and washing machine. We noticed only a few drops of water coming out of the pipe. The plumber said over the phone that maybe there was some paper in the pipes (he had put it in to prevent dirt from other works to enter the pipe before installing the appliances). 'The paper will eventually melt', he said, 'leave the water open and wait for the paper melting and suck the pipe'. And so we spent the week literally sucking at a pipe... After a fortnight we were able to speak over the phone with the plumber again (plumbers seem no good at phone picking, you know...:/) and he agreed to come over. He arrived and cut the pipe and found a paper with concrete chips inside... that little detail he didn't remember! WTF!


    And he said he needed a new plastic joint to join the pipe he had to cut, but it was Saturday afternoon and hardware shops were closed. However, I was determined to have that pipe fixed on that very day, so I said 'No problem, I'll take the bike and go to Easy to buy one', and so I did and got my dishwasher and washing machine installed that day.X/