Facebook private messages turn out to be not so private

There are 22 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by Splinter.

  • The Independent: FACEBOOK ADMITS COLLECTING PHONE CALLS AND TEXTS FROM PEOPLE'S PHONES, BUT CLAIMS IT HAD CONSENT


    The Sun: Mark Zuckerberg admits Facebook scans all the photos and links you send to people on its Messenger app

    The social media giant scans the content data of private messages sent between its users to check they do not conflict with its community standards


    It remembers me of an expat forum where I was banned from sending PMs because I didn't meet the community standard, apparently!

    To think about the kind of information I have been sharing on that forum through PMs for over 4 years, it gives me shivers. All information that I have shared PRIVATELY in bits here and there to different people and that are 100% accessible to the admin... who gets the whole picture. If this were a serious country, this could have legal consequences... however this is Argentina, and reading private posts on your forum does not violate any privacy laws, and even if it did, who cares? And more importantly... who would act upon it? :cursing:




  • I am a firm believer in what a close and trusted CIA friend of mine once told me long ago - (yes, "Virginia", even peasants (that's me) sometimes have friends in the most unexpected places):

    "Rarely is anything as it appears to be on the surface."


    I have been following (sort of) the latest news accounts of Facebook; nothing Mark Zuckerberg does would surprise me.

    NOTE: I have made no secret of the fact that I believe his motives, tactics, and "quests" are anything but looking out for the "best interests" of the Members of Facebook - as Mark Zuckerberg has claimed several times while being interviewed by various news commentators, analysts, and during "new conferences" he has attended.


    And that half-baked attempt by some members of congress to get him to testify to the U.S. Congress - ha! Never for a moment did I believe that would "fly". Just as well; anything he "testified to" would most probably be a lie anyway.


    What better way to keep track of the activities, thoughts, opinions, ideas, etc.. etc., of a vast majority of people (regardless of where they live) than to put in place a media source of which hundreds of millions of people are helplessly brainwashed and attracted to ?


    Putin never had it so good, ha ha. And the NSA is laughing all the way to the "vault" where the "files" are kept on all the "Facebook sheep".

    Glorious! Absolutely glorious!


    DJ

  • Probably to see if anything illegal is being sent. They use PhotoDNA

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PhotoDNA

    Never heard about it. Thanks for sharing.

    By the way, why the 'missilesque' avatar? :/

    I could say something 'bout this .... hehehhehe; but I had better be "nice" otherwise Splinter may knock the s.... (stuffings) out of me!

    Maybe I can get the "rights" to use these quotes on my new upcoming forum???

    Just kidding ... even I am not that wild or reckless .....


    DJ

  • Sometimes it helps to be old. When MySpace/Facebook first emerged as things, my inner voice asked, “now why in hell would I want to put that much of my private life into the public domain? What possible good could come from that?” Paying attention to Inner Voice’s wisdom, I refrained.


    I care not what Mr Zuckerberg does with his, or others’, data, because none of it is mine. Probably Congress should pass a resolution that he should be shot immediately, but they’re just as likely to give him a medal for outstanding public service.


    Let’s keep this in mind: every byte of personal, supposedly-secret data that’s been hacked and used nefariously, was surrendered voluntarily by its owner. How can it surprise anyone that it’s been misused?

  • Putting personal information on Facebook is a reckless, näive act. But who hasn't purchased an airline ticket online? There have been, for years, financial penalties for booking tickets by phone. So when Delta's customer information got harvested, were the customers to blame?

  • “To blame” is a value judgement, but in the final analysis, yes. We can prevent our info from being out there, but it’s getting harder and harder to live anonymously without moving into a non-electrified cave in Montana or Santa Fe.

  • “To blame” is a value judgement, but in the final analysis, yes. We can prevent our info from being out there, but it’s getting harder and harder to live anonymously without moving into a non-electrified cave in Montana or Santa Fe.

    With the new satellite imagery the U.S. Gov / Military has now, I suspect the only "safe places" left remaining for "anonymity" would be a distant planet from Earth - very distant! ;)


    By the way, I saw on this morning's news that Mark Zuckerberg will testifying before 51 Members of Congress starting at 11:15 AM Pacific Time. That should be interesting; going to watch it for a few minutes to see what kind of garbage and lies he can come up with!

  • Let’s keep this in mind: every byte of personal, supposedly-secret data that’s been hacked and used nefariously, was surrendered voluntarily by its owner. How can it surprise anyone that it’s been misused?

    Well, EJLarson , I am kind of not getting your point that the victim of a crime is as guilty as the perpetrator. However, in this modern time and age, it is really hard to stay out of these social media and not for the enticing effect they have on our brain, but also for the social connection that you can - indeed - make there.


    I have bought and sold many items thanks to Facebook, I have found clients, students and peers. I have reconnected with family members who now are a face and not just a name and that the next time I will meet will no longer be strangers to me.


    I have deleted my LinkedIn account due to a personal inner battle between my former and current professional life, but whenever I need to checkout professionally someone, the first results I get on Google are always on LinkedIn, and can be viewed only by registering to LinkedIn. So I have created a mock account just to lurk other people's profiles.


    I do not like that there are 'worms' (I don't know the technical term) harvesting profiles on the internet and reposting them without your consent (I guess) and without giving you the chance to correct it (that I am sure, as I have tried many times to have my data removed, to no avail).


    Remote workers like me find works online and my customers 'buy' me for what is my online presence. Hence, I have been using screen names for my personal accounts (such as on Facebook and forums), reserving my real name and surname only for those public professional-oriented presences.

  • Just clicked on the link you provided and read what he had to say about Facebook and Zuckerberg.

    I am glad to know there are a few people in this world who don't trust Zuckerberg anymore than I do!


    I thought I would get to watch the congressional testifying of Zuckerberg today (and again Wednesday I think) - but CBS local station where I live did not broadcast it - perhaps I misunderstood what the local CBS station said early this morning about it being broadcast.


    Anyone know if Zuckerberg's testimony was live broadcast???

  • Well, EJLarson , I am kind of not getting your point that the victim of a crime is as guilty as the perpetrator. However, in this modern time and age, it is really hard to stay out of these social media and not for the enticing effect they have on our brain, but also for the social connection that you can - indeed - make there.

    I didn’t say that. “Victim of a crime,” “guilty,” and “perpetrator” are value judgements. I made no such judgements. My comments were simple facts: if we put data out in public, our expectations should be that it will, sooner or later, be misused. We can be as careful as we can be, but if we put private data into the public hopper it should not surprise us that someday it comes down the chute and onto the street. It’s a price we pay for inhabiting the cyberworld.

  • I didn’t say that. “Victim of a crime,” “guilty,” and “perpetrator” are value judgements. I made no such judgements. My comments were simple facts: if we put data out in public, our expectations should be that it will, sooner or later, be misused. We can be as careful as we can be, but if we put private data into the public hopper it should not surprise us that someday it comes down the chute and onto the street. It’s a price we pay for inhabiting the cyberworld.

    "if we put data out in public, our expectations should be that it will, sooner or later, be misused. We can be as careful as we can be, but if we put private data into the public hopper it should not surprise us that someday it comes down the chute and onto the street. It’s a price we pay for inhabiting the cyberworld."


    Well stated! You are absolutely right; and I agree completely.

    And additionally this statement: " .... if we put private data into the public hopper [my emphasis] it should not surprise us that someday it comes down the chute and onto the street. It’s a price we pay for inhabiting the cyberworld."


  • Anyone know if Zuckerberg's testimony was live broadcast???

    It was, all over. You went to YouTube and searched for "zuckerberg senate", and had a choice of 5-10 live feeds. They're all up there now.

    By the way, I saw on this morning's news that Mark Zuckerberg will testifying before 51 Members of Congress starting at 11:15 AM Pacific Time. That should be interesting; going to watch it for a few minutes to see what kind of garbage and lies he can come up with!

    Barring a VERY few insightful moments, the only "interesting" thing going on was the sheer idiocy displayed by the majority of the senators. Pathetic softballs from some, grandstanding from others, and utter cluelessness from many if not most.


    You could almost feel bad for him, explaining basic tech to a group of geriatrics.


    It's not like they bumped into the guy on the street. They knew he was coming. They all have computer-literate staffers. They could have educated themselves, if only not to look absolutely silly when asking questions that made painfully clear how little they understood the subject of the hearing. They did none of this.

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