Driving Skills

There are 13 replies in this Thread which has previously been viewed 366 times. The latest Post () was by UK Man.

  • I've had the dubious pleasure of having been run over twice in my life. So driving skills is something I tend to be a bit interested in as I travel.


    For the record, the first time I was knocked down was by a motorbike in Malcesine, Italy in 1979 and the 2nd time was in Bangkok by a car on Good Friday, 2004. It wasn't a good Friday for me as my right-leg tib and fib were broken on that occasion.


    Now, the only time I ever saw a dead body hanging out of the back of a car was on the road back to Ezeiza in November 1993 but that said, and this is the point of this post, I've always found the standard of driving in Argentina actually quite good. Traffic tends to be obedient in my opinion and is pretty good generally.

    What say you?

  • First, let me say you’re the only person I’ve known who has been over twice, Bombonera . Quite a streak you have going!


    But yes, I definitely agree with you about the very good driving skills in Argentina. The streets themselves encourage mayhem - - poor or no lane markings, intersections without signals or signs, etc - - but the drivers in Argentina are models of intense concentration and situational awareness. I have the highest praise for their driving.

  • I don't wear it as a badge of honour Rice, but just my reality. I really do think though that the standard of driving in Argentina is pretty good even though I have read contrary opinions elsewhere and that's the point.


    One of my worst experiences other than above was a taxi journey in MIlan serafina wher the driver treated the journey as a race-course.

  • I was travelling to Ezeiza on a public bus with some local friends that day for my flight home. I have nothing else to say about that to be honest. It was 30 years ago.

    In Milan, I just recall the cars, amongst of which was the one | was in, were competing for space and position. It is sport to them.

  • I don't wear it as a badge of honour Rice, but just my reality. I really do think though that the standard of driving in Argentina is pretty good even though I have read contrary opinions elsewhere and that's the point.


    One of my worst experiences other than above was a taxi journey in MIlan serafina wher the driver treated the journey as a race-course.

    I was about to write that Argentinian drivers are slow and not very aware of their surroundings, always leaning toward the next lane, completely blind to indicators when you signal you are about to turn. And they never EVER stop to let you cross a crosswalk. It drives me nut! At least in Italy when you throw yourself into the crossing, they are forced to stop. In Argentina they pretend they didn't see you and accelerate. %&ç$$!!!

  • Out here in yokel land the standard of driving is f'ing abysmal. Not surprised to be honest as I was given a full driving license without ever having passed a test in my life. Thankfully for the few good drivers there are here I refuse to drive our car.

  • I wouldn't say that Argentine drivers are that good, but they are aware and the traffic flow is essential here. It almost always keeps moving, unlike in the UK where one single traffic cone will cause a 20 mile tailback.

    However, being a biker, I have a different perspective. Far too many drivers are texting with one hand and doing God knows what else with the other. I sit tall on my bike and can see everything.

  • Not that I'm in Buenos Aires centre that often but I must say I've always been impressed with the driving skills of the black and yellow taxi drivers. Whether I'd think the same if I was a fellow road user is a different matter.

  • the roads are nuts around here compared to back home. The streets around palermo seem small yet can still fit 4 cars, so are the drivers supposed to wait whilst we cross on the crossings of where no signs are showing?

    If you're crossing they should wait but look lively and don't hang about. ^^

    It's the same where I am although there's a severe lack of painted pedestrian crossings here. So I tend to just wait until the coast is clear before stepping out. My missus OTOH just steps out and glares at any approaching car drivers. So unless they have a death wish they soon slow down.