Chau ñoquis!

There are 10 replies in this Thread which has previously been viewed 1,319 times. The latest Post () was by UK Man.

  • I am eager to see how "presencialismo" will be restored. Since the pandemics, Cancillería, the office that issues apostilles, has been close to the public. Instead, the whole procedure can now be done online using the TAD (trámites a distancia) platform, but you need to have a registered profile with the government, associated to your bank account to pay and the turnaround time is around 2 months (vs. 2 days pre-pandemic). The cost is very small, just 900 pesos (around 1 USD).


    However, they also delegated the Colegios de Escribanos to issue Apostilles, although they use the same TAD platform, the timing is much faster (currently, 10 working days in Buenos Aires). However, the markup is outrageous, as the Colegio is now charging 11.500 ARS per apostille, of which just 900 ARS go to the Government.


    The same system is also used by Argentinian consulates around the world, which also provide apostille services through TAD, but in that case the turnaround is 2-3 days and the cost is 30 USD (they charge in the local currency abroad).


    Meanwhile, those who need an urgent apostille will likely turn to a private service which can deliver them in 24-48 hrs for a hefty 100 USD. Part is profit, part is bribe to speed up the process with the Colegio de Escribanos where their connection is.


    Another example of malpractice and malfunctioning public service.


    And to add a further layer of ridiculousness, at the Colegio de Escribanos they enforce an AFIP resolution where cash payments are limited to 10.000 ARS. When the apostilles were cheaper, they were sensible enough to charge separately fro each apostille. But since the apostille cost has breached the 10.000 ARS barrier, they ask to deposit the money at the bank tellers available within the Colegio de Escribanos, which are even manned. They have a ITAU teller and a Banco Ciudad teller. I have used only the latter, and they have taken my name, ID, firma y aclaración.

  • Since the announcement that ñoquis won’t be paid unless they actually show up for work (do they know where to go?), I can’t help wondering what will happen if they DO show up. There won’t be any desks for them, so will there be 3-4 people sharing a single desk?

  • .


    Meanwhile, those who need an urgent apostille will likely turn to a private service which can deliver them in 24-48 hrs for a hefty 100 USD. Part is profit, part is bribe to speed up the process with the Colegio de Escribanos where their connection is.

    Fortunately, on the rare occasions I need one I can get it done at no cost. Always give them a gift for doing it though.


    If rumours are be believed over the years this shoe factory here has largely been kept alive by Government handouts to keep the K supporters in a 'job'.


    Hoy a las 7 hs se realizó una asamblea de trabajadores fuera de la fábrica
    Con la presencia de varios trabajadores y el gremio UTICRA, se llevó adelante una asamblea en las puertas de la fábrica de calzado Bicontinentar para evaluar…
    www-larazondechivilcoy-com-ar.translate.goog

    Edited once, last by UK Man: Merged a post created by UK Man into this post. ().

  • The missus told me something last night. Her friend's sister in law who lives in Buenos Aires has been a noqui for years!! Seems she had a fling with Randazzo and it was him who got her the 'job'. She never worked a single day and spent her time travelling. She said I'd met her once or twice and had told me the story before.

  • The missus told me something last night. Her friend's sister in law who lives in Buenos Aires has been a noqui for years!! Seems she had a fling with Randazzo and it was him who got her the 'job'. She never worked a single day and spent her time travelling. She said I'd met her once or twice and had told me the story before.

    Not susprised to read that.


    One of the boss's cousins used to be a lawyer in the Casa Rosada. H e used to tell some good stories - there were 5 lawyers in his department - only two went to work every day..


    He also got half his wages in white into his bank account and then the other half in used notes in a dodgy brown envelope.

  • Not susprised to read that.


    One of the boss's cousins used to be a lawyer in the Casa Rosada. H e used to tell some good stories - there were 5 lawyers in his department - only two went to work every day..


    He also got half his wages in white into his bank account and then the other half in used notes in a dodgy brown envelope.

    The missus has told me countless similar stories over the years about people. I didn't really take them seriously but now I do. The bloke who rents our apartment in BA is a lawyer and was working for the K government. We're still waiting to hear what's happened to him.