What is better than a 3- day weekend in Argentina? A 4-day weekend. Obvio.

There are 23 replies in this Thread which has previously been viewed 819 times. The latest Post () was by aficionado.

  • Assuming that probably no one on this forum will have two paid work days on this extended holiday finde, I wonder how the weekend will affect you, and what, if anything, you will be doing differently during the 4-day weekend?


    I, for one, am enormously relieved that I don’t have to monitor the constantly changing blue rates until Tuesday.


    In the past, I’ve learned that many small businesses, including some small restaurants, will be closed (note to holiday schedulers: Mother’s Day is right up there with Valentine’s Day, for restaurant revenue. Bad coincidence for a holiday). So we’re prepared for meals of empanadas, choris, pizzas (frozen bakery crusts), and leftovers, in case our walks through the city don’t turn up an irresistible little parrilla that is open for business.


    So one plus and one minus.

  • The weather appears to be looking good for the 4 day weekend. One of the things I like is how the locals like to get out and about over the long weekend. The strong family bond underpinning Argentine society manifests itself well at the weekend it seems to me.

    What plans do you have for the weekend?

  • I arrived home yesterday morning at 07.45


    My remisero got stuck in a traffic jam on his way to Eze , caused by people going away for the weekend .


    Finally got picked up at 08.40


    The traffic was terrible - General Paz was blocked then the Panamericana was equally as bad.


    It took us 2 and a half hous instead of the nomal one hour 15 minutes


    Bllody holiday weekend.........

  • I went out for pizza with a friend in Olivos last night. Foreseeing a crowd, I got there at 7:50PM and I wasn't even the first! We had our pizza while people were waiting outside.

    If anyone is interested, a large pizza and a bottle of Andes was 8500 pesos (5850 the large pizza and 2650 the beer).


    No other plan for the weekend other than working and studying. And dieting. Ahem...


  • Bloody rip-off especially the Andes!!


    Is that ham on the pizza? :scratchead: I hope the white nail varnish wearer wasn't a bloke.

  • I’ve never seen so much ham on a pizza. Usually when you order ham, the pizza comes with grudging little bits of meat. The plain cheese side looks great.


    We’re revising our earlier thought that we should eat in all weekend, because on our walk yesterday, we stopped in a few restaurants to ask if they were closing for the holiday. All were staying open. To avoid the Mother’s Day crush, we’re definitely diving into the freezer tomorrow, but today we’re going to try Felipe, a new cocina porteña restaurant in the ‘hood.


    For those of us who like long rambles around the city, holidays are good times to walk for miles without traffic or carbon monoxide.

  • Good to see you back GJ. 👍 Hope you had a good time away.

  • How was the trip, and what did you do,

    7 hour trip for the dog to see the vet who specializes there. Not a recommended reason for anyone to repeat.


    I'd like to do that on the bike!

    Well this was one of the straight dusty stretches to detour the new asphalt they are working to build. I do not know if that is enough empty road to really enjoy. Still it was smooth and easy, not like the teeth chattering gravel ripio I know better.

  • 7 hour trip for the dog to see the vet who specializes there. Not a recommended reason for anyone to repeat.


    Well this was one of the straight dusty stretches to detour the new asphalt they are working to build. I do not know if that is enough empty road to really enjoy. Still it was smooth and easy, not like the teeth chattering gravel ripio I know better.

    Teeth chattering sums it up very well.

    I once did Cachi to Cafayate on the bike - 135 kms of gravel/ripio. It took me nearly hours because it was the wrong kind of bike for that terrain and I was absolutely knackered afterwards, but the first beer took care of that.

  • Teeth chattering sums it up very well.

    I once did Cachi to Cafayate on the bike - 135 kms of gravel/ripio. It took me nearly hours because it was the wrong kind of bike for that terrain and I was absolutely knackered afterwards, but the first beer took care of that.

    Speaking of which. The council here have started the process of improving the dirt road out to our quinta by making it gravel. Which is great as it'll mean it will become passable to all after heavy rain and not just those who drive 4x4 vehicles.

    Trouble is, the first process involves them spreading a layer of large clinkers/slag on top then buggering off. It's been left for the norml traffic passing over it to compress it into the dirt before they'll spread a layer of gravel on top. Been weeks now and it's still a bone shaker of a ride over the 200 yards they've done so far....only another 10kms to go!! A lot of people who live in the countryside use small motor bikes to get about, How they manage to negotiate it is beyond me.