Living healthily in Argentina

There are 14 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by Rice.

  • On another forum, a user published this list about his tips for living a cancer-free life. I cannot invite him over as I cannot use the PM feature over there, but I believe it makes for an interesting topic. If reading the food list alone, I would have said it was describing the Argentinian diet.


    What I am not doing right: white flour and alcohol, and canned tomatoes. I am working on the non-white flour pasta, but the options are limited right now (just fusilli and spaghetti available). Soy is also often part of my diet, though I do not enjoy its taste -- it is used in vegan preparations a lot, so I cannot avoid it easily.

  • Beelzebub! While hydrogenated fats, soft drinks and processed "cheese" hold no appeal for me, the rest of the 'Foods To Avoid' list sounds like my dream menu.


    What is the origen of the list? The Masochist's Complete Guide To Misery?

  • I feel that this list is a list of all the things that I love to eat. Fortunately, Cancer is not the first cause of death: Cardiovascular illnesses is the first.

    I thing that "moderation" and "temperancy" are the best keys to have long life.

  • I asked Steve how much his diet costs each week but he never replied.

    I am not Steve, and he lives far in the countryside so fresh produces are much cheaper to him.


    We eat vegan at home and hit the veggie-fruit shop once per week. I usually spend $350 per week there. Then we buy pasta, rice and legumes at the dietetica, but it is much cheaper than fresh veggies.


    Supermarkets are much more expensive and with lower quality fresh produces.

    Also rice and beans are more expensive in supermarkets. Dieteticas cater a far wider selection.

    For fruit and vegetables you have to try out several verdulerías to find one catering a good variety and quality.

    For dieteticas try to go to bigger ones so that the food won't sit in a bag for months, or you'll get fly-infested grains.


    What neighborhood do you live in? Maybe we could share tips.

  • Please share more tips on the forum -- I've just learned from your post that I should be shopping more regularly in dieteticas.


    Verdulerías pose more of a challenge, because they let everything sit unrefrigerated until it sells or decomposes. How much actual food value can remain in a yellowed, limp stalk of broccoli?

  • Verdulerías pose more of a challenge, because they let everything sit unrefrigerated until it sells or decomposes. How much actual food value can remain in a yellowed, limp stalk of broccoli?

    I do agree! Apparently not all people know how to recognize a ripe fruit or veggie, so shopkeepers keep selling subquality produces.

    I have found a verdulería 4 blocks from home which I believe is also a distributor, so they have a high turnover of produces. Anyway, always go take a peak and see what looks okay and what not. I cannot believe how people can veggie-shop on the phone.


    It also useful to know the seasonality of veggie & fruits in Argentina, which are highly variable. Thanks to the different climates of the country, tomatoes are good most of the year as they are sourced from different provinces.


    This article by Allie Lazar lists the season produces and names some verdulerías in severa 'hoods of the Capital. Of those listed there, I know Nelly but stopped going there because the service is so slow. I am currently doing my grocery shopping at Los hermanos, Gascón 1100. It is the one next to the parking, not the one which is a minimarket.

  • I live in Versalles.


    It seems I am in a cycle of buying bulk produce and watching a decent percentage decay before I get to eat it. I don't have time to go to the verduleria every day, and once a week buys means the food won't last. Any progress towards healthier eating has been really hampered by access to ingredients, cost, and quality of food.


    of course, I am a terrible cook so that also holds me back. One thing any vegan friend I have ever had possessed was a love of the kitchen and cooking. I find it a chore, even when making something I love.

  • of course, I am a terrible cook so that also holds me back. One thing any vegan friend I have ever had possessed was a love of the kitchen and cooking. I find it a chore, even when making something I love.

    You hit a resonant note for me there. No vegan I, not even close, but my love of kitchen and cooking make these issues pertinent, as they should to anyone who would rather eat good food than bad, and can tell the difference.

  • I live in Versalles.


    It seems I am in a cycle of buying bulk produce and watching a decent percentage decay before I get to eat it. I don't have time to go to the verduleria every day, and once a week buys means the food won't last. Any progress towards healthier eating has been really hampered by access to ingredients, cost, and quality of food.

    Why do you buy in bulk? If it is to save money, most vegetables can be frozen (though it would be healthier to eat them fresh).

    What kind of vegetables do you like? Would you consider delivery services that cater healthy food? I am not talking about pedidos ya, but about regular groceries coming to your door in a ready to eat (or heat up) package. There are some services like this online, but of course they are not cheap.


    If you live alone, I can totally get you. When I was a student I followed the astronauts' diet and lived off canned food. The quantities were always too much and the effort to prepare everything for just 10 minutes to consume the meal was really not worth it.

  • Why do you buy in bulk? If it is to save money, most vegetables can be frozen (though it would be healthier to eat them fresh).

    What kind of vegetables do you like? Would you consider delivery services that cater healthy food? I am not talking about pedidos ya, but about regular groceries coming to your door in a ready to eat (or heat up) package. There are some services like this online, but of course they are not cheap.


    If you live alone, I can totally get you. When I was a student I followed the astronauts' diet and lived off canned food. The quantities were always too much and the effort to prepare everything for just 10 minutes to consume the meal was really not worth it.

    Is it really true that fresh vegetables are healthier than fresh frozen ones? I've never known -


    Surely foods that are frozen when really fresh retain more nutrients than those that sit, unrefrigerated, on a verdulería shelf for 24+ hours?

  • Is it really true that fresh vegetables are healthier than fresh frozen ones? I've never known -

    I have heard several version, such as amminoacid chain that get broken when frozen or stuff like that. But you are the chemist here, Rice Anyway, in doubt, I would not frozen, if possible. But in Semigoodlooking 's case seems the way to go.


    Leafed vegetables would be soggy when thawed, but, for example, I use frozen parsley since a whole bunch of parsley is too much for us (unless when preparing a taboulé). I just wash, dry an chop it, and then freeze it and use when necessary. The same I do for basil (of course, there is nothing like the smell of fresh basil, but better a frozen basil than the dried basil they sell here).


    20150617-tabbouleh-vicky-wasik-16-1500x1125.jpg

  • ... Or the dried basil sold ANYWHERE. Can you keep albahaca growing on your terraza for most of the year, by continuously making cuttings and rooting them?

    My mom has basil all year over, but she shed it in winter using bubblewraps (in Italy winter are colder than here). Basic should not be directly exposed to sunlight as it suffers the strong heat. Ideally, it should have sun in the morning. I should plant some! We planted curry and mint last year, but rarely use those.

  • My mom has basil all year over, but she shed it in winter using bubblewraps (in Italy winter are colder than here). Basic should not be directly exposed to sunlight as it suffers the strong heat. Ideally, it should have sun in the morning. I should plant some! We planted curry and mint last year, but rarely use those.

    Rosemary and oregano (perennials) are also really rewarding plants. When there is a breeze, you will smell the rosemary. Heavenly!