15-minute cities

There are 8 replies in this Thread which has previously been viewed 302 times. The latest Post () was by Carlos.

  • City planners, urbanists, and environmentalists in countries such as the UK, Australia, the USA, Denmark, Spain and Argentina have been discussing the concept of the 15-minute city.  Simply put, this is a city where essential services could be accessed by  all residents within 15 minutes.  In the process the city inevitably reimagines neighborhoods’ public spaces and streets for the benefit of all regardless of age, mobility, or background.


    Three years ago, the mayor of Paris made this a central part of her successful campaign for re-election. The term was introduced in 2016 by the Sorbonne University’s Professor Carlos Moreno, whose expressed interest is in making the well-being of humans the central concern of urban organization: “The idea is to promote sustainability and health by reducing car dependency and increasing physical activity.”


    This Washington Post story I read mentions that, despite the inevitable conspiracy theories of a “socialist plot,” Moreno makes a point that the idea has been embraced by city leaders spanning the political gamut, “from Buenos Aires to Busan.”


    Ottawa was one the first cities to have embraced the idea, asking residents to take half of their trips by carpooling, bicycling, walking, or taking public transportation.


    C40 Cities (see link below), focused on fighting climate change, has suggested the concept as an actual plan for economic recovery after Covid. [note: one member of their 13-member steering committee is from BsAs.]


    Is this an idea that could work in Buenos Aires? With its subte and bus systems, public spaces, and growing bike paths, are many of its barrios already 15-minute cities?


    15-minute city - Wikipedia
    en.m.wikipedia.org


  • This idea is specially designed to avoid the transportation by long distances, a result of the growing "gated communities" or Barrios Cerrados in Spanish that flourished from 2000 onwards. A clear example is Nordelta, a new city created in the Tigre County which has been copied in other many places.

    The sad outcome is this:any person who has a family there and have a job in BA downtown, needs to ride 120 kms per day to arrive to his office. His wife needs another car to bring the children to school, mostly private and expensive.

    Any medical support, especially those importants, are in BA, not in those places (exception the Austral Hospital in Pilar)

    A complete waste of energy, money and stress to do every day.

    HM KIng Charles III, when he was Prince of Wales, with the aid of a Luxemburg architect, Leon Krier, designed a town,very traditional and very british called Poundsbury, in the region of Cornwall. HM had private property of the land, and he donated the terrritory to do that.

    In the beginning, all the architectural establishment laugh and saw with contempt this idea, but the people liked it

    and now the place is growing and doing very well. All services are at 15 minutes from every house, which looks like the small town ot Downton Abbey. Nothing to do with the monstruosities of the Brutalist period (1960-1980)that created huge dwellings of ugly architecture, and some of them had been already demolished because they were vandalized by poor people, like Robin Hood Garden, designed in the 1970 by Alison & Peter Smithson.

    The same happened here with the Barrio Ejercito de Los Andes, another monstruosity in fashion at that time in Argentina.

    When I defend King Charles III is because he is considered by many as a "good for nothing". Especially those who are in the Hyper intellectualist establishment. I believe he deserves more appreciation, as his ideas at least retain the charming of the English countryside and small cities. (that we argentineans admire)

    For more information, please see in Google "Poundsbury" in Cornwall.


    I regret to correct myself; is Poundbury,, not Poundsbury.

    Life inside King Charles' town of Poundbury which he moulded into his own  vision - Dorset Live

    Here is the 15 minutes city. Human scale prevails.

  • I guessed that you would be very familiar with this concept, Carlos .


    Googling Poundbury, I learned the list of restrictions that residents must follow: To not paint or decorate the exterior of the property in any different colours without the consent of Prince CharlesNot to make any alterations or additions in or to the exterior of the property without planning permission and approval from the dukeTo not erect any additional fencing or walls around the propertyNot to remove any trees or shrubs which are planted within the boundary of the homeFor no signboard advertisement placard, or house name to be placed in the windows of any houses or on the exterior without approval of the princeNo caravans or boats should be brought onto the property or placed in the parking spaces

    Except for prohibiting house names or other placards, these rules are almost identical to those in our neighborhood, and don’t seem strict to me.


    I’m disappointed that this experiment of King Charles hasn’t actually helped much, environmentally. Wickipedia notes that “It has not reduced car use, as originally intended. A 2022 report said "Poundbury has been highlighted for its pedestrian and public transport links and not being as 'car-based' as other developments across the country."

  • The article of Wikipedia ignores completely this essay of 15 minutes city. It remarks the biased intention as regards HM the King. Of course people must follow the restrictions. If not, see what happens in my city of BA, plenty of ugly buildings in the low class areas. Freedom uncontrolled managed from uneducated people produces urban uglyness.

    This professor Moreno did not discovered any news. At least,Poundbury is a beautiful city. I would like to have this in

    Argentina, not copying England, but referring to the old cities founded by the Spanish rule. Also this urban design was good before the overpopulation and concentration appeared at the end of XIX century.

  • Anyone who finds Poundbury’s regulations stringent has never belonged to a condo or homeowners’ association!


    I read many positive reactions like this one:

    It's a fantastic place to live and raise a family. Great schools, friendly, Jurassic coastline etc., All my family have moved from London to Dorchester/Poundbury now, including elderly parents.

  • The article of Wikipedia ignores completely this essay of 15 minutes city. It remarks the biased intention as regards HM the King. Of course people must follow the restrictions. If not, see what happens in my city of BA, plenty of ugly buildings in the low class areas. Freedom uncontrolled managed from uneducated people produces urban uglyness.

    This professor Moreno did not discovered any news. At least,Poundbury is a beautiful city. I would like to have this in

    Argentina, not copying England, but referring to the old cities founded by the Spanish rule. Also this urban design was good before the overpopulation and concentration appeared at the end of XIX century.

    You do have them here; they are called Barrios Cerrados.

  • “Why Beauty Matters” is a wonderful, thought-provoking video.


    Regarding 15-minute cities’ benefits:

    We have a friend in a suburb of Houston, whose young wife suffered a stroke this year. Because paramedics arrived at their house in 5 minutes and whisked her immediately to the hospital where treatment began immediately, she has no appreciable lasting effects. Were one of us to have a similar scare, it would take almost an hour for the ambulance to reach us and get us to the hospital to begin treatment.


    We have not chosen our location as wisely as our friend did.