Obtaining a Spanish passport for grandchildren of Spanish nationals will soon be possible

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  • The Ley de Nietos and Ley de Memoria Historica will hopefully be approved by the Spanish senate in October, facilitating many people to be granted Spanish citizenship. This has been rumbling on for years and I only know because Adri and her sister have been following it closely. Their mother has a Spanish passport because her mother was Spanish.

    If this law is passed, which it is expected to, both Adri, her sister and their children will be able to apply for Spanish passports, thus giving them the opportunity to consider living in Europe.

    España aprobó una ley que facilitará la obtención de la ciudadanía: cuáles son los requisitos
    La "Ley de Nietos" o "Ley de Memoria Histórica" busca que los hijos y nietos de españoles puedan obtener la ciudadanía sin necesidad de residir. El proyecto…
    www.ambito.com

  • Post-Brexit, are there any implications for the two of you, if you wanted to live in Spain?

    Good question and it all depends on what future we plan for ourselves. I wouldn't want to live in Spain again anyway, but ironically, Adri could live anywhere in Europe if she got the passport. How much easier it would be for her to live in the UK? I'm not sure of that either.

    There are serious financial considerations to moving away from here as well.

  • That is a great understatement. Despite Argentina’s staggering inflation, year after year, it is still a very affordable country for people earning in pesos, and of course much more so for people earning in foreign currency.


    EU inflation has been much more reasonable over the past few decades, but the cost of living can be staggering. I haven’t been to the UK in a few years, but I assume the same is true there?

  • Not to detract from, but to augment the original thread - Travel+Leisure magazine just sent this information:


    “Below are seven countries in which you're in luck if you have a grandparent — or in some cases, any ancestors — who came from there.


    “Ireland Even if you were not born in Ireland, you are eligible for Irish citizenship if one of your grandparents was born on the island or was an Irish citizen at the time of your birth, according to the Irish Foreign Ministry. In order to get a passport, you have to apply for Foreign Birth Registration, which can take up to a year to process.

    “United Kingdom Applying for British citizenship through a grandparent is a three-step process that takes several years. If you can prove one of your grandparents was born in the U.K., you first have to apply for a U.K. Ancestry visa, which allows you to stay in the country for five years. After those five years, you can then apply for permanent settlement, or indefinite leave to remain. Once you have had that status for a year, you can apply for citizenship.

    “Italy In Italy, descendants of Italian citizens are often eligible to become citizens themselves — and there is no limit on how many generations ago your ancestors left the country as long as they maintained their own Italian citizenship until they had kids of their own, according to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation of Italy. You can prove this lineage through things like birth and marriage certificates.

    “Spain You can apply for Spanish citizenship if one of your grandparents was originally Spanish themselves, according to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, European Union and Cooperation of Spain. But in order to do so, you have to first live in Spain legally for one year.

    “Hungary Hungary considers most people with Hungarian grandparents to be Hungarian citizens, so all you have to do is apply to verify your citizenship (and it doesn't matter if you speak Hungarian or not). If your grandparents lost their Hungarian citizenship — which tends to come up due to different peace treaties that followed WWI and WWII — you can still apply to be a Hungarian citizen through the simplified naturalization process, but you do have to speak Hungarian.

    “Germany If your ancestors lost their German citizenship because of religious, political, or racial grounds from 1933 to 1945 — which applied to a lot of Jewish people and other persecuted groups who fled Nazi Germany — you may be eligible to have that citizenship restored. In order to claim this, you have to be able to say that if your ancestor had not been deprived of their German citizenship, you would have acquired it by birth.

    “Lithuania You may be eligible to obtain Lithuanian citizenship if one of your grandparents or great-grandparents (who had citizenship before 1940) left Lithuania before 1990 or was a deportee or political prisoner. In order to prove this lineage, you have to submit things like birth certificates or documents concerning studies or work prior to 1940.”

  • Not to detract from, but to augment the original thread - Travel+Leisure magazine just sent this information:


    “Below are seven countries in which you're in luck if you have a grandparent — or in some cases, any ancestors — who came from there.


    “Ireland Even if you were not born in Ireland, you are eligible for Irish citizenship if one of your grandparents was born on the island or was an Irish citizen at the time of your birth, according to the Irish Foreign Ministry. In order to get a passport, you have to apply for Foreign Birth Registration, which can take up to a year to process.

    “Spain You can apply for Spanish citizenship if one of your grandparents was originally Spanish themselves, according to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, European Union and Cooperation of Spain. But in order to do so, you have to first live in Spain legally for one year.

    Under the new law, which is expected to be ratified in October, we believe that applicants won't have to live in Spain for a year.

  • Why is that, UK Man ?


    I would imagine it's because she runs the local Spanish Consulate in Chiv.

    Indeed. Being the Honorary Vice Consul she receives no payment and that includes everything from stationary to wifi. Not a problem as she knew that before taking over the role. Her main problem is, even though she only officially opens by appointment every Tuesday people phone her any day of the week. Since the expected new rules were published she's had many more inquiries.

  • That is a great understatement. Despite Argentina’s staggering inflation, year after year, it is still a very affordable country for people earning in pesos, and of course much more so for people earning in foreign currency.


    EU inflation has been much more reasonable over the past few decades, but the cost of living can be staggering. I haven’t been to the UK in a few years, but I assume the same is true there?

    To tell the truth, and not defending irrationally Argentina, you can live as an upper medium class with 1000 dollars per month (not including hiring a house).

    And also for being a such disgraced country, you have a fair medical infraestrcture and care, and a reasonable safety if you choose sure places to live.

    I have serious doubts if you can live with less that 1000 Euros in Europe.

  • Yikes! Can she resign to, as American politicians always say, “spend more time with her family?”

    Any time she moans about it I tell her to give it up. She won't though as it's the least of her problems. Her mother has dementia which is her main worry. The homes here leave a lot to be desired so she's been organising helpers/carers to cover 24/7.

  • We did that for a number of years for my Mom too. Her mind was great but her body was so frail. She definitely wanted to stay in her own house, and fortunately, she was able to. But I know what Mrs UK man is going through. It’s not easy to find someone competent, caring, and committed to the job.

  • We did that for a number of years for my Mom too. Her mind was great but her body was so frail. She definitely wanted to stay in her own house, and fortunately, she was able to. But I know what Mrs UK man is going through. It’s not easy to find someone competent, caring, and committed to the job.

    We've been very lucky so far Rice....they're angels as far as I'm concerned. :thumbup:

  • To tell the truth, and not defending irrationally Argentina, you can live as an upper medium class with 1000 dollars per month (not including hiring a house).

    And also for being a such disgraced country, you have a fair medical infraestrcture and care, and a reasonable safety if you choose sure places to live.

    I have serious doubts if you can live with less that 1000 Euros in Europe.

    Probably true Carlos more so now that the economic effects of the pandemic are kicking in over in Europe. Argentina has had many years experience of handling high inflation compared to Euope. So ironically in some ways are far better prepared for it. 😁

  • Adri and her sister have today gone to the Spanish Consulate to present papers in preparation for applying both for them and their children. It's hard to keep up with this law to be honest, because it keeps changing.

    Apparently this is a limited time offer of 12 months, so lets see what happens.

    Let me know how they get on. :thumbup: