Eejit and other unusual words

  • Cumbia music's not my cup of tea especially when it's blasting out from a clapped out car driven by a non licensed/insured eejit.

    Nice use of the word eejit , - I found out recently that it is only used in Scotland & Ireland.


    Comes from the vernacular pronunciation of the word "Idiot"

  • Nice use of the word eejit , - I found out recently that it is only used in Scotland & Ireland.


    Comes from the vernacular pronunciation of the word "Idiot"

    I should add there are also plenty of young eejits driving about the streets in the UK blasting out deafening BOOM BOOM BOOM sounds!!

  • Nice use of the word eejit , - I found out recently that it is only used in Scotland & Ireland.


    Comes from the vernacular pronunciation of the word "Idiot"

    It’s my favorite word learned from a dear Irish friend. She also loved to regale us with childhood tales of her sister warning her about being on time for school, “or you’re going to be kilt!”


    (As I write that, I guess she’d also have said “learnt?”)

  • Both versions of the word are actually correct and widely used in the English-speaking world, but there is one small difference between the two words. 'Learned' is the preferred way of spelling in the US and Canada, while 'learnt' is favoured in British English.


    and how about this?



    Kill or Be Kilt (Highland Spies Series Book 3)
    Kill or Be Kilt (Highland Spies Series Book 3)
    www.amazon.com

  • “Kill or be Kilt.” I love a good pun.


    I believe the British past participle form (learnt, spilt, etc) was the preferred if not the ONLY form used in the US in the 19th and early 20th century. Why that form evolved from -t to -ed, I don’t know. This is an example of languages evolving differently in the mother country and its colonies in the New World.


    It is interesting that the French spoken in SW Louisiana is much closer to that spoken in Maine than that spoken in France. Both American states’ French-speaking people inherited the language from ancestors who had arrived in the 18th century after living in NE Canada, where the language had changed during the 150+ years they were there.

  • just remembered there is another word in UK English - learned as in a learned scholar - with the emphasis on the ed at the end - ie learn - ed

    Yes, that is the same: a learned professor, a blessed hermit, pronounced with two syllables.


    I was criticised by an American reader for using the word, whilst, in my recent novel. It's a Brit thing apparently.

    https://www.grammarly.com/blog/while-vs-whilst/

    This difference can drive an American editor crazy, while/whilst working on a Brit’s manuscript!

    😉😁😜