Venezuela implodes

There are 6 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by GlasgowJohn.

  • "As Venezuela limps into early 2018, it is increasingly isolated from a Latin America that is heading in a more market-friendly direction. That includes former allies, Argentina and Ecuador. Six presidential elections are scheduled for 2018—Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Mexico and Paraguay—and none of them are likely to bring into office friendly governments willing to shield Maduro’s autocratic regime. The only friends left within the region are Cuba, Bolivia and Nicaragua, hardly shining examples of democratic governance and they are economically unable to help the regime. As the Venezuelan economy further melts down, more people from that country are going to flee to Colombia, Brazil and the Caribbean. There have already been reports of boats with Venezuelans sinking and drowning, which gives the image that they could be Latin America’s newest round of “boat people,” fleeing horrible conditions at home."


    The full commentary here:


    http://nationalinterest.org/fe…mic-social-collapse-24247

  • It's truly heart-breaking to see reports on Venezuela in the news.


    I would like to know if the crisis affects all social classes or just he poorest ones. Last summer (June 2017) I met with a Venezuelan in Italy -- his family is still in Venezuela. I asked him if the situation was so dire as it sounded and he didn't seem much concerned. He said he'd like to bring his brother to Italy, but not in a very concerned fashion, more like 'it would be cool'.


    Anybody has first-hand reports?

  • The high class people always can find a way to stay better under a dictatorship like Venezuela.

    Middle classes are much more damaged, and the poor remain the same.

    Venezuela is today as we woud be if CFK succeded. Imagine a Scioli president in Davos?

  • It's truly heart-breaking to see reports on Venezuela in the news.


    I would like to know if the crisis affects all social classes or just he poorest ones. Last summer (June 2017) I met with a Venezuelan in Italy -- his family is still in Venezuela. I asked him if the situation was so dire as it sounded and he didn't seem much concerned. He said he'd like to bring his brother to Italy, but not in a very concerned fashion, more like 'it would be cool'.


    Anybody has first-hand reports?

    Serafina, the Venezuelan you met in Italy either belongs to a privileged group or maybe just doesn't like his family! We have a Venezuelan friend in the US whose anxiety for his family in Venezuela is constant and very real. They have severe food shortages, can't get necessary medicines, and completely go without any goods not produced in the country.

  • In the mid to late eighties, I used to visit Venezuela on business three or four times a year.

    In the nineties, I still averaged one visit a year

    I have some great memories and some great friends. I was lucky enough to travel throughout the country and build up great relationships with a wide variety of people.

    I still keep in contact with all of them – some have gone to live in USA, others to Europe but the majority have stayed.

    Three or four years ago Fernando, my Venezuelan “brother” said , it can’t get any worse..

    But it did and it has and it continues to do so

    What does the future hold? Maduro is still there because he has the military on his side and they have successfully kept the opposition divided. The day he loses the military there will be a coup d’etat or an invasion from a foreign power.

    When? There were signs last year of divisions in the military. But still nothing…

    Most of the business owners I know have been suffering – they are living off their savings

    As far as I can see everyone is suffering except Maduro and the ruling clique and some of the generals.

    For everyone’s sake , I hope Maduro goes soon.