12 of the worst places to live in the USA

There are 13 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by EJLarson.

  • As a foreigner, these images are unbelievable for a person who always saw the USA as the promised land. But I understand that in a country so big, some problems appears. Nothing is impeccable.

  • Sadly the greatest cities always come with the greatest shame, in the form of uncontrolled poverty and untenable living circumstances. Could we do better by our fellow humans? Absolutely! Are we failing the least of our brothers? Definitely.

  • The commentary is way beyond annoying.


    It took me about 15 seconds to find this: https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/…spots-revealed-50-5852573 As we can see, things are terrible in the UK - it's a real hellhole.


    There can't be anyone alive today on the planet who doesn't know that crime and poverty exist, and are worse in some places than others. Anything new here? As to solutions? They've all been tried at one point or another. I have no answers, and can only continue to live in a way that doesn't contribute to the problem, and help when the opportunities arise.

  • As a citizen of the United States, and a resident of #2 in the Video Presentation (i.e., Reno, Nevada), i can personally testify that the comment

    about Reno being in economic decline is far from the truth.

    A major economic up-swing has been going on in Reno for several years, but more especially since late 2016.


    There are "tons" of NEW construction of businesses, homes, apartments, Residential Multiple Use Complexes, etc., etc., going on right now!

    Unfortunately, for the people who are not "flushed" with money, it is becoming more difficult every year to find affordable housing.


    And the crime rate: Well, that has increased so much since 1995 that there truly is no true and accurate comparison now (2018) to what life was like

    in 1995 - (as pertains to SAFETY and SECURITY).

    It is not uncommon to hear gun shots ringing out in the wee hours of the night - even where I live - which is considered one of the

    "better neighborhoods".


    But the worst of it is, the Police couldn't care less about those gun shots - and other occurrences; they only become concerned if it pertains to

    one of their own (policemen); Casino Owners; Bankers; and of course, Politicians!

    All other resident citizens are considered less than worth "saving" from the thugs who roam the streets 24/7 !


    Bottom line for me: IF MONEY WERE NO OBJECT (in other words if I had at least 10 Million USD) I would NOT remain in the United States, period!


    DJ

  • There are several countries: However Austria would be at or near the top of my list.

    Interesting! Why do you continue to live in Reno? And what is it about Austria that attracts you -- for living, I mean, not just for visiting? My guess is that, without the gun craziness of the US, just about any town or city in Austria would be safer from gun violence. Affordability of housing might be closer to that in the average small US city than that of Reno. But the last time we spent an appreciable number of weeks in various cities and towns of Austria, I felt that the cost of living was significantly higher there. (Is that why your threshold would be $10 million USD?). Scenery: plus. Language: minus.

  • Seems that you picked an interesting city to live in!


    Of course we all know that we can believe everything we read on the Internet, and I took all of five minutes for my research, so ...


    ... says here that crime in general has been falling significantly in the US since the 90's. Reno, however, has its own dynamic: crime is rising dramatically, counter to the national trend.


    So maybe instead of Austria you could just move to Carson City? (It's average.)

  • Interesting! Why do you continue to live in Reno? And what is it about Austria that attracts you -- for living, I mean, not just for visiting? My guess is that, without the gun craziness of the US, just about any town or city in Austria would be safer from gun violence. Affordability of housing might be closer to that in the average small US city than that of Reno. But the last time we spent an appreciable number of weeks in various cities and towns of Austria, I felt that the cost of living was significantly higher there. (Is that why your threshold would be $10 million USD?). Scenery: plus. Language: minus.

    WHY do I continue to live in Reno?

    ANSWER - Part A: It takes a lot of money to make a residential move; Part B: The older I get the more difficult it is to "break away" and start from "scratch" -

    it's called the "comfortable syndrome" in some psychiatric circles.


    What is it I find attractive about Australia?

    ANSWER: Several things - the culture (I am a fan of classical music); the fact Austria (unlike the United States) has not allowed a massive influx of people

    into their country who have no intention whatsoever of maintaining their culture OR values; and last but not least, I LOVE passenger trains.

    By living in Austria, it would be possible to travel by passenger train (and the trains in Europe are 10,000 percent better than in the U.S.) to many countries

    in that pat of the world; and in great style too..


    Yes, the cost of living in Europe IS expensive!

    And if I were to live there, I would need enough money to make sure I could live out my remaining years (?) in STYLE, not having to worry about money;

    also, MOST countries in Europe (again unlike the U.S.) will not let an individual move to their country without absolute proof that the individual/s relocating there can do so without any possibility that the person will become a financial liability to the Government.


    As for "language": If I had the money to move to Austria, I would also have money to hire language tutors (teachers) who could at least enable me to learn

    sufficiently one of at least three languages spoken in Austria.

  • I didn't "pick" Reno, Nevada as a place to live in the truest sense of the phrase. Rather, fate OR Karma played a huge part in me moving to Nevada;

    of which is far too extensive and complicated to explain here.:P


    As for 'crime falling significantly in the United States' - OMG (oh my God) if only that were true! BUT IT IS NOT! Unfortunately.:(

  • We did consider Austria, as well. Being European citizens, the bureaucratic part would have been swift. However, a big city like Wien, with a comparable cultural offer to Buenos Aires, would have been too expensive for us to enjoy. Like CruiseJunki said, one would like to move to live better and 'in style' and not to make their life worse.


    We also considered living in the outskirt of Wien, let's say a 30 min train ride away, but considering the price of the ride, we wouldn't have taken the train so carelessly.

    We used to live the same distance from Milan, and also had a car, and we rarely went out in Milan because it was so expensive to enjoy. Going to Milan to eat a slice of pizza on the go and to 'hold it' until coming back is not enjoying Milan.


    The language was also a big barrier, so we considered Wien city because we could find an expat community where we could make friends, as opposite to making local friends. Also, we had read negative experience of Italian immigrants to Austria, and since we were choosing in a 100% autonomous fashion where to live, the idea of moving to a place where we would have been considered second-class people was not appealing.


    Taken all these things into account, I believe that Barcelona would be the closest to Buenos Aires we could try to reproduce in Italy. Others cities on the Costa del Sol, a smaller scale of Barcelona, could be cheaper. That said, we are in our 30's with no children, so social and cultural life held great relevance in our choice.

  • Also, we had read negative experience of Italian immigrants to Austria, and since we were choosing in a 100% autonomous fashion where to live, the idea of moving to a place where we would have been considered second-class people was not appealing.

    Yes, I've heard of that, too.


    Two of my all-time favorite movies are Pane e cioccolata and Pane e tulipani. Recommended to all.