Paying taxes in Argentina

  • I'm a permanent resident but don't have a CUIL. The missus says it would complicate matters. As I have no desire to become Argentine anyway it doesn't matter .

    Don't they automatically give you a DNI when you become a permanent resident? That usually comes with a CUIL. You can look up your CUIL online with your name and ID number.

    Also, as far as I know, there is no road to citizenship. I am currently doing the paperwork for my son and my husband. My son is getting citizenship but they told me all they can offer my husband is residency through the "family reunification visa"... I don't know.


    Your wife said it would complicate matters to get a CUIL? Or to try to pay taxes?

  • Don't they automatically give you a DNI when you become a permanent resident? That usually comes with a CUIL. You can look up your CUIL online with your name and ID number.

    That's news to me. I've certainly got a DNI number but no CUIL unless the missus is telling porkies.

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    Don't they automatically give you a DNI when you become a permanent resident? That usually comes with a CUIL. You can look up your CUIL online with your name and ID number.

    Also, as far as I know, there is no road to citizenship. I am currently doing the paperwork for my son and my husband. My son is getting citizenship but they told me all they can offer my husband is residency through the "family reunification visa"... I don't know.


    Your wife said it would complicate matters to get a CUIL? Or to try to pay taxes?

    Yes, you do get a DNI after your three years application is up and you've completed the steps. But that doesn't mean you get a CUIL number straight away. For that you would want to open a bank account or buy a house for example and you get the number from ANSES which kicks off the process. A CUIT number on the other hand is for when you've signed up with AFIP (Inland Revenue) if you have to pay taxes on local income or assets generated in this country.

    Apparently, the difference between CUIT and CUIL is that the former is a tax number and the latter is normally for employees, or as I mentioned above, for matters that don't involve the taxman.

    If you're from the US, or any country that has an arrangement with Argentina and you're bringing money in from that country for which you already paid tax on, you won't have to pay tax on it again.

    I have permanent residency status on my DNI, like many other expats and feel that's enough, for me anyway. serafina knows more about citizenship than I do and she may have some more info on this.

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    When I got my first DNI as permanent resident, it did have a CUIT number on the reverse side. I think that when you enrol as a worker here you get a CUIL, which I assume matches the CUIT ( Splinter?).


    I naturalised by marriage and there is no waiting period if you are married to a citizen by birth. When I got married, the registrar told me I was immediately entitled to apply for both permanent residency and for citizenship. Permanent residency is faster and gives you a DNI, which is useful to do everything from opening a bank account to getting a job or a supermarket card. I also read on the Internet that it is easier to get citizenship once you have your DNI. At first, I wasn't interested in citizenship and I started toying with the idea when it became a recurrent subject on expats' online venues.


    About applying for citizenship by marriage, Argentina makes a distinction between those who are native Argentinian by ius solis (because they were born on Argentinian soil), those who are Argentinian by option (born abroad to Argentinian parent(s), who opt to take Argentinian citizenship) and those who - like me - are naturalised Argentinian by marriage, residency or other category (stateless, refugees, persons of public relevance or who contributed considerably to the country, and those with distinguished public service or who served for Argentina). So, not all citizens are the same in Argentina, something I find very petty if you ask me. Perhaps I could apply immediately because my husband was a native Argentinian (born in Argentina). Your husband would fall into the same category.




    After I naturalised I had to get a new DNI, = different number. The new card has no CUIT on the reverse, but it states the date of my naturalisation and the case number. I had to go to an ANSES office to get one because they needed to link my old CUIT with the new one. The CUIT is usually 27-[your DNI]-anotherdigit, hence new DNI meant new CUIT.



    As the spouse of an Argentinian or parent to an Argentinian, your husband is entitled to permanent residency and depending on what kind of Argentinian you are, he might be straight away entitled also to citizenship. My naturalization was delayed of a few months because at the juzgado the Secretary failed to notice that my husband was a citizen by birth, and hence she stalled my application because she wanted me to be a resident for 2 years before moving on. I was a little upset because my husband had been coming with me and spoke with them every single time, and on the initial form I stated the reason of my petition as being married to a native Argentinian. ?(


    Overall, it took just over 1.5 years to complete the whole process, but the Province of Buenos Aires is notoriously very slow and crowded. If you live in a less crowded place, where naturalization applications are just a handful, it can be done in under a year.

    The odd thing about it is that you have to present a piece of paper every two months instead of collecting all the required paperwork and present it at once. I think they did it on purpose to check I was committed. I remember that on other forums there were some people who wanted Argentinian citizenship but didn't actually lived here most of the time.




    See LEY 346, article 2, item 7 - this applies also for any spouse of a native Argentinian, nowadays.


    These are the two applicable laws on naturalization:


    DECRETO NACIONAL 3.213/1984 decreto-reglamentario-sobre-ci.pdf


    Ley 346 - ley-de-ciudadania..pdf

  • I can't remember exactly how long it took to get my DNI when we made a permanent move back here. To be honest the missus done most of the leg work and I just tagged along when needed. A few months in total I think.
    I suspect the reason why I never was registered with the tax man was because there was no benefit in doing so. It just wasn't worth the hassle especially as I would never have a 'proper' job anyway. Not at all interested in applying for citizenship/naturalisation.

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    I can't remember exactly how long it took to get my DNI when we made a permanent move back here. To be honest the missus done most of the leg work and I just tagged along when needed. A few months in total I think.
    I suspect the reason why I never was registered with the tax man was because there was no benefit in doing so. It just wasn't worth the hassle especially as I would never have a 'proper' job anyway. Not at all interested in applying for citizenship/naturalisation.

    It will have taken three years, with the last year not being allowed to leave the country.

    I did the first application through an agent who used smoke and mirrors to rush it through and when quoted an extortionate price ($4000) to complete the final leg, I simply went to the registry of physical persons (love that name) and did it for $30.

    I didn't register with the taxman either, but had to when I started a business, but that's another story.

  • If you're from the US, or any country that has an arrangement with Argentina and you're bringing money in from that country for which you already paid tax on, you won't have to pay tax on it again.

    Since I get paid on a 1099 I don't technically pay taxes until I file. Based on what I read, all I'm paying in Argentina now will be a write off when I file next year. I will come back and share what I learn, if it's worth it. As I mentioned, my income is pretty low so I barely pay taxes as it is.


    When I got my first DNI as permanent resident, it did have a CUIT number on the reverse side. I think that when you enrol as a worker here you get a CUIL, which I assume matches the CUIT

    Yes, that's why I assumed that everyone with a DNI has a CUIL. My 6 year old has one. If you Google it, there's a site that tells you what your CUIL is. But it may be that under certain circumstances you need to apply for one.

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    CUIT (Clave Única de Identificación Tributaria) is for any individual or entity, CUIL (Código Único de Identificación Laboral) is for employees, according to this article

    https://www.ambito.com/finanza…-hay-cuil-y-cuit-n5061069


    I have correct myself: my first DNI had a CUIT. I am wondering why, since I got it by marriage and I wasn't an employee. :/


    I will be eager to read your updates, laurafran. I always knew there was no tax agreement between the US and Argentina, which is one of the reasons why people don't want to keep their foot in two shoes.

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    I wonder why that is the case?

    https://www.greenbacktaxservic…merican-living-argentina/

  • It looks like in my case I would have to pay taxes "here and there" since I am self employed. However I am not too concerned since I make so little that when I file my taxes in the US uncle Sam feels sad for me and throws me some cash 😁


    It's weird about the CUIL/CUIT, since, like I said, my 6 year old has one. I guess it's like when you get a green card in the US and it says "allowed to work" whether you do so or not....

  • The missus was moaning today aboit having to pay tax on a seven figure peso amount she received recently..which is a paltry amount nowaday anyway. I said why are you complaing you'd pay more tax than that if you lived in the UK. Are Argentinians living in cloud cuckoo land?

  • Maybe paying taxes in general is distasteful to many Argentines? That’s the situation in Greece, you know.

    That's the impression I get. To be fair the system here especially for the self employed probably doesn't help. If it's anything like how most other things work here it'll be complicated and confusing.

  • But is there ANY country whose citizens aren’t unhappy with the way their tax money is spent?

    I get the point, but there are levels. When I pay taxes in the UK, I know some of that money does go to use, whether I agree or not. I do not like every government program or use for the money, but I do know for the most part the money is being spent on improving the country (either an improvement I like or one I think is misguided).


    Here, I don't think people have any confidence that a single peso is being put to good use. More importantly, they know some, much, all of that tax money is being stolen too.