Brit who was living in Cambodia (and now back in the UK)

  • Hi,

    Just been reading up about Argentina and the possibilities excite me. Sounds like there are a few potential business opportunities.

    My background is in aquaculture/fisheries management (ran fish farms lectured degree and masters students in the UK). A few years ago I learnt to code and now I'm mostly a freelance software engineer with some cyber security stuff on the side.

    I'm looking at investment opportunities in Argentina, I realise that in order to buy rural land in the country you need to be an Argentine national. But you can do that by being an Argentine resident for 2 years. I also realise that there was recently a wealth tax in Argentina and the possibility for more which is rather disconcerting.

  • Hi, Brit In Cambodia - welcome to the forum! I see you have another post with well thought out, specific questions that I’m sure our members can help you with. Glad you found us!


    Do read through the forum and enter into discussions in other threads, as well. We will welcome your perspective. You will notice that our membership is weighted heavily toward your countrymen -

  • I'm looking at investment opportunities in Argentina, I realise that in order to buy rural land in the country you need to be an Argentine national. But you can do that by being an Argentine resident for 2 years. I also realise that there was recently a wealth tax in Argentina and the possibility for more which is rather disconcerting.

    The 2 year requirement can be overridden if you hire a lawyer who knows how to take advantage of a loophole in the law. That said, Argentinian citizenship is for life and you can't renounce to it. The only way to lose it, is they strip it from you for irregularities in your naturalization procedure.


    I don't see any particular advantage to getting Argentine citizenship if you have a British passport already. I think those who naturalize are either from countries with even less 'prestigious' passports or because of family (to have the same right as an Argentinian spouse over children / to be able to stay here indefinitely regardless of civil status or children) and for sentimental reasons/love for the country.


    The Argentinian tax system is draconian to say the least, and if you do business abroad (as it seems you case as a developer) you can start with 50% less just by converting your USD earning to pesos at the official rate (which is half the street rate). One of the thing that still pisses me off a lot is the brain drain to keep up with the exchange rate.


    You will find out that basic needs of modern society are a DIY affair because the system is simply broken. If you need to manage/store your money, you'll have to find alternatives, if you want security, you'll need to fend for yourself or pay for security systems / guards, if you need health assistance, you will need private insurance, of you have kids, you will need private schools etc.

  • I don't know what, that foreigners can't own land thing is about, i used to own 200 acres up north and the only regulation was that , being a foreign national, you could not own land right on the international border. In my case and where i was , there was a 5 kilometer buffer zone , but that varies from province to province and within a province also there are different regulations from county to county( mine was 5 kilometers, the next county over , was 15 kilometers)

  • Hi, Brit In Cambodia - welcome to the forum! I see you have another post with well thought out, specific questions that I’m sure our members can help you with. Glad you found us!


    Do read through the forum and enter into discussions in other threads, as well. We will welcome your perspective. You will notice that our membership is weighted heavily toward your countrymen -

    Thanks Rice :)

    Thanks that's very interesting to know.

    I don't know what, that foreigners can't own land thing is about, i used to own 200 acres up north and the only regulation was that , being a foreign national, you could not own land right on the international border. In my case and where i was , there was a 5 kilometer buffer zone , but that varies from province to province and within a province also there are different regulations from county to county( mine was 5 kilometers, the next county over , was 15 kilometers)

    Ok I read somewhere that you couldn't buy rural land as a foreigner, from what I'm reading now it appears that you can only buy up to 10000 hectares and that foreigners cannot own collectively more than 15% of a regions rural land.