Covid-19 vaccine

  • Who would have connected Brexit to Britain’s winning the vaccine race?


    Well, the Telegraph is implying just that. I’m curious enough about the article that I may have to %#^*?! subscribe to find out.


    Brexit may have helped Britain win the race for a Covid vaccine. You can follow every political update at home and abroad, including Jacob Rees-Mogg describing Europe’s response to this ‘British success’ as ‘sniffy’. Envious eyes have been cast from America, too, with Donald Trump reportedly ‘livid’ at the USA’s regulator as Britain approves the vaccine first.

  • This morning in The Times:


    On what is being called "V-Day", the first cohort of British patients will receive coronavirus vaccinations today, with the head of the NHS welcoming it as a "decisive turning point in the battle with the pandemic".

    Trials are being planned in Britain to "mix and match" vaccines to see if combining the Oxford and Pfizer jabs produces a stronger immune response.

    Meanwhile, a "universal" flu vaccine has gone through the first stage of human trials in a bid to prevent future pandemics. The vaccine, designed to work against influenza even if the virus mutates, has passed phase one trials, showing it is safe and results in antibodies.


    The White House refused the chance to buy extra doses of the Pfizer vaccine this summer, it emerged as President Trump prepared to announce plans to provide the jab across America.

  • If it is true that Argentina made a pre-production agreement to buy the Russian vaccine, will everyone in Argentina be required to have that one, or will there be other options?


    I ask because of this very disturbing mention in this morning’s NY Times:


    People should avoid alcohol for two weeks before they receive the first dose of the Russian coronavirus vaccine and for another six weeks afterwards, the head of the country's public health watchdog has said. Sales of equipment to make samogon, or moonshine, have risen steeply since the start of the pandemic.

  • Rice , the Argentine government are trying to buy as many vaccines as possible.


    The Russian one is the firts to arrive , I understand


    They also have a deal set up to buy the Astra Zeneca - Oxford , part of which is being produced here ( In Garin)


    Lets say that 20 million people agree to be vaccinated - that is 40 million vaccines ......

  • People should avoid alcohol for two weeks before they receive the first dose of the Russian coronavirus vaccine and for another six weeks afterwards, the head of the country's public health watchdog has said. Sales of equipment to make samogon, or moonshine, have risen steeply since the start of the pandemic.

    Two weeks before and six weeks afterwards?

    Yeah, I can really see that working.

  • Thanks for putting my mind at ease, GlasgowJohn . I haven’t seen any such restrictions for any other vaccines. And seriously, why would anyone with a choice take the Russian vaccine, with its dubious safety?


    Not to mention abstention from Malbec, of course.

  • Maybe Fernandez & Fernandez can call upon Cristina's Havana connections to get on Cuba's list.


    From today's Washington Post:


    "Cuban leader Fidel Castro vowed to build a biotech juggernaut in the Caribbean, advancing the idea in the early 1980s with six researchers in a tiny Havana lab.

    Forty years later, the communist island nation could be on the cusp of a singular breakthrough: Becoming the world’s smallest country to develop not just one, but multiple coronavirus vaccines.

    Five vaccine candidates are in development, two in late-stage trials with the goal of a broader rollout by May. Should they prove successful, the vaccines would be an against-the-odds feat of medical prowess — as well as a public relations coup — for an isolated country of 11 million that was added back to the U.S. list of state sponsors of terrorism in the final days of the Trump administration.


    Cuban officials say they’re developing cheap and easy-to-store serums. They are able to last at room temperature for weeks, and in long-term storage as high as 46.4 degrees, potentially making them a viable option for low-income, tropical countries that have been pushed aside by bigger, wealthier nations in the international scrum for coronavirus vaccines.


    They could also make Cuba the pharmacist for nations lumped by Washington into the “Axis of Evil” and “Troika of Tyranny.” Iran and Venezuela have inked vaccine deals with Havana. Iran has agreed to host a Phase 3 trial of one of Cuba’s most promising candidates — Soberana 2 — as part of a technology transfer agreement that could see millions of doses manufactured in Iran.

    “We have great confidence in Cuban medical science and biotechnology,” Venezuelan Foreign Minister Jorge Arreaza told The Washington Post this week. “It will not only be fundamental for Venezuela, but for the Americas. It will be the true solution for our people.”


    Maduro touts miracle cure to mask massive problem: Venezuela can’t (or won’t) get vaccines


    That could bring prestige to a government under fire for a crackdown in recent months on free-speech protests led by artists, poets and gay rights activists, known as the San Isidro movement.


    “In the public eye, it would soften the image of a country that’s being accused of doing some pretty bad things,” said Eric Farnsworth, a critic of the Cuban government and vice president of the Council of the Americas and the Americas Society. “It undermines the message that Cuba is a broadly authoritarian country that can’t produce anything good.”


    (for full story: https://www.washingtonpost.com…PECLDjsYeM21rsrs_ZC091maw)

  • Not sure too many people will believe the Cuban story.


    I have met a few Cuban doctors over the years and whereas I respect them for their knowledge and training, they are seriously underfunded and the hospitals have little equipment to do anything complicated.


    Could a Cuban lab develop a vaccine in a short period of time? I seriously doubt it.

  • Not sure too many people will believe the Cuban story.


    I have met a few Cuban doctors over the years and whereas I respect them for their knowledge and training, they are seriously underfunded and the hospitals have little equipment to do anything complicated.


    Could a Cuban lab develop a vaccine in a short period of time? I seriously doubt it.

    It appears to be the case as their vaccines will be appearing in Argentina soon.

    So that's Russia, China and now Cuba. Venezuela next?

  • I’m skeptical about the Sputnik vaccine because of the apparently rushed up testing, but we do know, with all the vaccines, that it’s still possible to test positive, even if asymptomatic, or to even contract a mild case after being vaccinated.


    But so far, vaccines appear to live up to promise: keeping people from dying or landing in the ICU.

  • Rice ...How do you feel about the proposed bill about proving proof of being vaccinated in order to enter into some places. Maybe I should find my old

    Army dog tag chain and have a tag stamped with my covid shot record.