Peanut Butter

  • In our regular back & forth trips from USA to Argentina, we have always brought peanut butter, hard to find except for hit & miss in barrio chino. In 2005, we brought only a jar for ourselves, but each year we seemed to bring a little more for friends. Last time, we brought 9 jars. Then we started seeing it in our neighborhood chinos, and thought we might not need to keep packing it in.


    In the months we’ve been unable to return to Argentina, I’ve wondered if peanut butter and other imported foods have, once again, become harder to find?

  • In our regular back & forth trips from USA to Argentina, we have always brought peanut butter, hard to find except for hit & miss in barrio chino. In 2005, we brought only a jar for ourselves, but each year we seemed to bring a little more for friends. Last time, we brought 9 jars. Then we started seeing it in our neighborhood chinos, and thought we might not need to keep packing it in.


    In the months we’ve been unable to return to Argentina, I’ve wondered if peanut butter and other imported foods have, once again, become harder to find?

    Look what I made this morning...Bocadito Marroc. The missus bought me this jar of peanut butter the other day in the greengrocer....I saw La Anonima are also selling peanut butter but a different brand. Both are Argentine produced. Not the crunchy type but smooth.


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  • Recipe, please? I love those Marrocs! This looks like Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups, only with better, creamier, dark chocolate....

    They're actually very simple to make....if I can make 'em anyone can!!

    Most recipes on You Tube where I got mine are similar. Here's what I used. 300gr milk chocolate 150gr white chocolate. Uisng a bowl over a pot of hot water melt half the milk chocolate adding two soup spoons of peanut butter. Line a square dish with plastic film and pour the mixture in. Give it a shake to make it level then put it in the freezer. Now melt the white chocolate and mix in two spoons of peanut butter by the time you do this the fist batch will have hardened enough for you to pour over the top. Then it's just a case of doing the same again with the other half of the milk chocolate. Bung it back in the freezer until it hardens then cut it up into squares.

    You can vary the amount of chocolate/peanut butter depending how much you want to make.

  • Where did you buy the white chocolate, UK Man ? I can DO THIS!

    Strangely enough in a shop recommended by my MIL's carer which mostly sells stuff for party organisers. I have to admit I had my doubts but it's actually of decent quality. They sell it in loose small chunks.

    • Helpful

    Milk chocolate from the same place

    Yes. Next time I shall also get dark chocolate which they also had and add it as a third layer instead of two layers of the milk. I shall get the name of the makers of the chocolate as I forgot to take note of it. They sell it loose or in kilo bags.

  • Milk chocolate from the same place? serafina , do you have any sourcing ideas in our ‘hood?

    I don't. Unfortunately since we moved to Capital, my husband's diet has forced me to stop baking. I don't have the time or energy to learn to bake vegan cakes. It is possible and they can still be yummy, if only I knew how to do it. From my research, it is not possible to simply switch animal-derived ingredients with non-animal, because of the text, texture, behavior when baked etc.


    I do follow some vegan recipe pages based in Argentina, because foreign vegan recipes call for ingredients which are not available here (either because they are semi-refined or imported).

  • The transition to cooking vegan must be a near-impossible challenge. We always think of vegan main dishes, but of course pastries are another challenge.

    In Mar del Plata there is a lively vegan community and a couple of people have started making and selling their vegan pastries. Most vegan cookers/bakers just make plain scones/biscuits/cookies. But a couple do also wet cakes (such as sponge cakes with fillings, creams etc.) which are delicious and easier to digest.


    I have been looking for the same thing in Capital, but I only found one retired lady doing them on order. She explained that she had to keep her cakes simple because some ingredients are too expensive, so the cake price would be out of market. She bakes at home.

    She says the vegetable cream (to make vegetable whipped cream) is so expensive, it can easily double the price of a cake.

  • That is unfortunate, because prices so much higher than actual animal products must prevent some people from being able to eat vegan. Or at least vegan desserts.

    If buying ready-made food, being vegan is more expensive than eating meat due to the market (definitely not because of costs, since cultivating, processing and shipping vegetables is definitely cheaper than farming cows, butcher them, transport their carcass refrigerated etc.


    Definitely there is more dedication to food preparation with a vegan diet, because even a salad takes longer than a steak and fulfills your appetite less. There are also less commercially available options, although there has been a considerable increase of vegan offer in dieteticas in the last month.


    The Chilean brand of vegan products Not.Co make a great vegan mayonnaise, also sold in Carrefour for very competitive prices. Their range of products has the aim to provide good quality and competitive prices with non-vegan food, and through the mass distribution (supermarkets), too.


    Con la bendición de Bezos: la foodtech chilena NotCo desembarcó en Argentina y promete una revolución alimenticia

    Una mayonesa de base vegetal

    La novedad es que desembarcó ayer en forma oficial en la Argentina con su producto estrella NotMayo, la mayonesa que solo utiliza ingredientes de origen vegetal, mantiene el sabor y evita las desventajas de la tradicional, además que, según su fabricante, genera menos dióxido de carbono y consume un 83% menos de agua en su elaboración que una mayonesa tradicional (que usa aceite, limón y huevo). El furor del producto en Chile fue tanto cultural como en ventas: captaron 12% del mercado de mayonesas en 2 años. Los planes para la Argentina son similares: ya están presentes en 800 dietéticas y en dos meses planean estar en todas las cadenas de supermercados, apuntando a capturar el 8% del mercado en 8 meses.

  • That looks very promising for vegans in Argentina. What about clothing? Are there decent leather alternator shoes and bags?

    I have no idea and I am not very strict about this issue, specifically. Leather is cheap in Argentina, and it seems good quality. However, I am not a fan so I don't have a strong opinion about it.

    To be honest, I bought a simple wallet in a style similar to this because it can fit business cards in the outer pouch and money and documents in the main section.

    Between locally sourced leather and plastic from China, I think the former still makes more sense.


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  • Personally can't stand Peanut butter. I tasted recently peanut butter popcorn and ice cream, both over powering with the taste of peanuts


    Why did I have peanut butter popcorn and ice cream? Well I just wanted to taste it to see if I would like it again. No is the most definite answer to that

  • Must admit eating the peanut butter I got here on its own isn't very nice. I suspect the peanut butter I used to scoff for years in the UK had something added to it to make it taste sweeter.