Rules for mailing to Argentina - what can you mail?

There are 12 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by UK Man.

  • USPS has an exhaustive page on the (many) rules of shipping to Argentina.

    Sounds very complicate.

    Country Conditions for Mailing — Argentina



    Prohibitions (130)


    Coins; banknotes; currency notes; securities payable to bearer; traveler’s checks; platinum, gold, and silver; precious stones; jewelry; and other valuable articles except in insured Priority Mail International.

    Furs and skins of chinchillas and vicunas.

    Radioactive materials.

    Radio and television receivers, phonographs and combinations.

    Ready-made clothes and fabrics unless they are typical family presents and have no commercial value.

    Perishable infectious biological substances.


    Restrictions

    Bees, plants, seeds must be accompanied by a health certificate countersigned by the Argentine Consul.


    Observations

    1. Argentine customs legislation stipulates that in all cases the addressee must be present to authorize the opening, checking, and customs clearance of packages. To expedite the examination of such packages, the sender should write in a suitable place on the customs Declaration, the phrase “Peutetre Ouvert D’ Office” (May Be Opened Officially), followed by his signature.
    2. Each commercial shipment must be accompanied by a consular invoice in duplicate. These invoices must include a declaration signed by the seller or his representative reading: “I declare under oath that all the information given in this invoice is true and the prices indicated are those that actually have been paid (or will have to be paid). I also declare that no arrangements have been made that would make possible any alterations in these prices.” The following articles do not require consular invoices:
      1. Books, reviews, newspapers, printed papers and scientific and literary periodicals, on condition that no import duty is payable.
      2. New or used effects or articles imported for noncommercial purposes or not of a saleable nature or value, intended for personal use or consumption and which, by reason of their quantity or type, give no grounds for thinking that they are intended for sale, and which do not exceed the value above which import duty would have to be paid.
      3. Goods in transit for other countries.
      4. Samples without saleable value (unused).
      5. Brochures, posters, printed papers, diaries, almanacs, negatives, photographs, films and other miscellaneous publicity articles advertising foreign goods or concerns, which are marked to prohibit their free sale.
      6. Spare parts and accessories for supplying or repairing foreign ships or aircraft in Argentina, if these are considered indispensable for continuing the journey.
      7. Customs, properties and other belongings of visiting theatrical companies.
      8. Goods returned to Argentina after definitive or temporary export unless a return invoice was explicitly requested when authorization for temporary export was granted.
      9. Educational equipment or materials intended for schools or scientific research institutes, whether as purchases, gifts, loans or technical or financial aid, on condition that the Argentine Ministry for Foreign Affairs and Religion gives permission beforehand.
    3. Used linen and clothing must be accompanied by a certificate of disinfection issued by a competent authority in the country of origin and countersigned by an Argentine consular service. In areas without an Argentine consular service, a disinfection certificate issued by the competent authorities is sufficient. The wrapper must be marked “Disinfection Certificate Enclosed.”




    Global Express Guaranteed (210) Price Group 8


    Refer to Notice 123, Price List, for the applicable retail, Commercial Base, or Commercial Plus price.

    Weight Limit: 70 lbs.


    General Conditions for Mailing

    See Publication 141, Global Express Guaranteed Service Guide, for information about areas served in the destination country, allowable contents, packaging and labeling requirements, tracking and tracing, service standards, and other conditions for mailing.


    Size Limits (211.22)

    The surface area of the address side of the item to be mailed must be large enough to completely contain the Global Express Guaranteed Air Waybill/Shipping Invoice (shipping label), postage, endorsement, and any applicable markings. The shipping label is approximately 5.5 inches high and 9.5 inches long.

    Maximum length: 46 inches

    Maximum width: 35 inches

    Maximum height: 46 inches

    Maximum length and girth combined: 108 inches


    Value Limit (212.1)

    The maximum value of a GXG shipment to Argentina is $1,000 or a lesser amount if limited by content or value.



    Insurance (212.5)

    See Notice 123, Price List, for the fee schedule for GXG document reconstruction insurance and non–document insurance.





    Priority Mail Express

    International (
    220) Price Group 9


    Refer to Notice 123, Price List, for the applicable retail, Commercial Base, or Commercial Plus price.

    Weight Limit: 44 lbs.



    Priority Mail Express International — Flat Rate Envelopes

    Flat Rate Envelopes: The maximum weight is 4 pounds.

    Refer to Notice 123, Price List, for the applicable retail, Commercial Base, or Commercial Plus price.



    Size Limits (221.42)

    Maximum length: 36 inches

    Maximum length and girth combined: 79 inches


    Insurance (222.7)

    Available for Priority Mail Express International merchandise shipments only


    See Exhibit 322.2 for individual country merchandise insurance limits. See Notice 123, Price List, for the fee schedule for Priority Mail Express International merchandise insurance coverage.



    Customs Forms Required (123)


    Articles Admitted

    Required Customs

    Form/Endorsement

    Business papers and documents.

    PS Form 2976-B placed inside PS Form 2976-E (plastic envelope).

    Endorse item clearly next to mailing label as BUSINESS PAPERS.

    Merchandise samples, microfilm, microfiche, magnetic disks and tapes for computers, brochures with technical information on merchandise, and industrial plans and drawings.

    PS Form 2976-B placed inside PS Form 2976-E (plastic envelope).

    Merchandise and all articles subject to customs duty.

    PS Form 2976-B placed inside PS Form 2976-E (plastic envelope). Include a commercial invoice in each item.

    Note: For mailers completing PS Form 2976-B or an online combined shipping label and customs form that electronically transmits customs-related data, no additional customs form is required because customs information is incorporated into the form that the mailer must complete.

    Note:

    Coins; banknotes; currency notes, including paper money; securities of any kind payable to bearer; traveler’s checks; platinum, gold, and silver; precious stones; jewelry; watches; and other valuable articles are prohibited in Priority Mail Express International shipments to Argentina.

    Reciprocal Service Name: Door to Door

    Country Code: AR

    Areas Served: All



    Priority Mail International (230) Price Group 9


    Refer to Notice 123, Price List, for the applicable retail, Commercial Base, or Commercial Plus price.

    Weight Limit: 44 lbs.




    Priority Mail International Flat Rate

    Flat Rate Envelopes or Small Flat Rate Priced Boxes: The maximum weight is 4 pounds. Refer to Notice 123, Price List, for the applicable retail, Commercial Base, or Commercial Plus price.

    Flat Rate Boxes — Medium and Large: The maximum weight is 20 pounds, or the limit set by the individual country, whichever is less. Refer to Notice 123, Price List, for the retail, Commercial Base, or Commercial Plus price.



    Size Limits (231.22)

    Maximum length: 42 inches

    Maximum length and girth combined: 79 inches


    Insurance (232.91)

    Available for Priority Mail International merchandise only (see 323.72 for markings)


    See Exhibit 322.2 for individual country merchandise insurance limits. See Notice 123, Price List, for the fee schedule for Priority Mail International merchandise insurance coverage.




    Customs Forms Required (123)

    All Priority Mail International items:

    PS Form 2976-A inside PS Form 2976-E (envelope)




    First-Class Mail International (240) Price Group 9


    Refer to Notice 123, Price List, for the applicable retail price.

    Weight Limit: 3.5 oz. for letters and postcards;

    15.994 oz. for large envelopes (flats).


    Size Limits

    Letters: See 241.212

    Postcards: See 241.221

    Large Envelopes (Flats): See 241.232


    Customs Form Required (123)

    PS Form 2976 as required (see 123.61)




    First-Class Package International Service (250) Price Group 9


    Refer to Notice 123, Price List, for the applicable retail, Commercial Base, or Commercial Plus price.

    Weight Limit: 4 lbs.


    Size Limits

    Packages (Small Packets): See 251.22 and 251.23.


    Customs Form Required (123)

    PS Form 2976




    Airmail M-bags (260) —


    Direct Sack to One Addressee Price Group 9


    Refer to Notice 123, Price List, for the applicable retail price.

    Weight Limit: 66 lbs.


    Customs Form Required (123)

    PS Form 2976



    Free Matter for the Blind (270)

    Free when sent as First-Class Mail International (documents only), First-Class Package International Service, Priority Mail International Flat Rate Envelopes, or Priority Mail International Small Flat Rate Priced Boxes.

    Weight limit: 4 pounds.

    Free when sent as Priority Mail International items. Weight limit: 15 pounds.


    Customs Form Required (123)

    First-Class Mail International items or First-Class Package International Service items:

    PS Form 2976 as required (see 123.61)

    Priority Mail International items (including Priority Mail International Flat Rate Envelopes and Priority Mail International Small Flat Rate Priced Boxes):

    PS Form 2976-A inside PS Form 2976-E (envelope)




    Extra Services


    Certificate of Mailing (310)


    Individual Pieces — Refer to Notice 123, Price List, for the applicable price:

    Individual article (PS Form 3817).

    Firm mailing books (PS Form 3665), per article listed (minimum 3).

    Duplicate copy of PS Form 3817 or PS Form 3665 (per page).

    Bulk Quantities — Refer to Notice 123, Price List, for the applicable price:

    First 1,000 pieces (or fraction thereof).

    Each additional 1,000 pieces (or fraction thereof).

    Duplicate copy of PS Form 3606.



    Registered Mail (330)


    Fee: Refer to Notice 123, Price List, for the applicable price.

    Maximum Indemnity: $42.66

    Available only for First-Class Mail International (including postcards), First-Class Package International Service, and Free Matter for the Blind sent as First-Class Mail International or as First-Class Package International Service.



    Return Receipt (340)


    Fee: Refer to Notice 123, Price List, for the applicable price.

    Available for Registered Mail and insured Priority Mail International parcels only.



    Restricted Delivery (350)


    NOT Available for International Mail as of January 27, 2013



    International Postal Money Order (371)

    NOT Available



    International Reply Coupons (381)


    NOT Available for International Mail as of January 27, 2013



    International Business Reply Service (382)

    Fee: Refer to Notice 123, Price List, for the applicable price:

    Envelopes up to 2 ounces.

    Cards.

  • Mission accomplished!!!!

    Didn't read to the end, because I know whatever I wanna have shipped will be on list!

    And if not, still will be a huge hassle to become it!!!!

    Such a joke!!!

    This whole system is made to make people give up before they even think about it!!!!

    At least after 10. December we will be able to order shiploads of efedrin again....


    :D

  • I always found the clothes restrictions total perverted.......which other country would ban personal clothes shipments???? (Assuming it's for personal use)

    The disinfection reason is such a vague argument......unless you would need to present such a certificate by entering the country with your suitcase also.

    Been living all around, and never in my life I have been restricted in receiving anything....(legal stuff obviously).

    Living in Amsterdam I always bought a lot stuff in the USA, including gun related items, never had a problem. But a pair of dirty jeans is a hazard to the safety of the Argentinian people...... Don't make me laugh!!!!

  • The country seems obsessed with petty rules and regs. Bonkers!

    A friend of mine, who is a horse vet, makes regular trips to Uruguay by car and was telling me yesterday that on one occasion he was prevented from taking a wooden horse brush across the broder because the wood hadn't been treated correctly.

    Naturally, he told them where they could put the brush.

    :beatdeadhorse:

  • just does not make any logical sense...... assuming that the people arriving here with their goods or having shipments sent, tend to come from civilized countries with strict rules and control......at least more than Argentina. I could understand why they would maybe limit packages from Africa f.ex., bit from USA and Europe, or a brush from Uruguay????


    In the other hand strict rules and limitations makes sense in a country like Australia f.ex., since 99% would enter through the airport.......still I would bet I could send a pair of dirty jeans there without any problems!!!!


    Got me to think of my last trips to Germany.....Everytime I had small cooling bags with ice and meat in my checked in luggage, (for sure not ok!!!!), Still never have been stopped !!!

  • I remember reading about a Norge here who had her father sent her woolen sweaters she had forgot home... and they were sent back because apparently you cannot ship woolen product to Argentina (I can't find this rule above, maybe it was the sanitization one).


    I imagine people queuing outside of Argentinian Consular Offices with the laundry receipt :th_giggle01:

  • This is what happened to me in 2014 when a friend rather stupidly sent me a pair of sunglasses from Texas:


    So a mate of mine in Texas posts me a pair of sunglasses as a gift in January and a few days later he asks me if they've arrived yet.

    That was the funny part.

    Having almost given up on them by March, I ride down to the main postal centre in Buenos Aires and queue up for an hour with everyone else, only to be told no dice without an advice note from the postman.

    I also zoom down to the local post office, but their system is down….again.

    So I phone Correo Argentino customer service and they say it’s in the sorting room with all the other international parcels and that I should just wait for the postman.

    By May, I had definitely given up all hope and resigned myself to the inevitable. In fact, I had blotted all thoughts of hi-tech sunglasses completely from my mind.

    Last week, the postman arrived when we weren't in and left an advice note saying that a telegram had arrived and he would try again the next day. Which he did.

    A telegram? Had I inherited a fortune or was I being summoned for a speeding fine? Or being deported?

    The three page A4 telegram on quality paper from Correo Argentino informs me that a package was awaiting collection at Ezeiza international airport and I would need to undertake a series of insane paper-chase exercises, including an online customs declaration (known rather scarily as a sworn statement) that the value of the goods doesn't exceed US$25 and then present myself at a disused aircraft hangar somewhere in the Argentine hinterland.Oh, and if the parcel is not collected within 5 days, storage will be charged and after 15 days, returned to sender.

    All this after waiting nearly six months.

    So, armed with my sheaf of sworn statements, I zoom 50kms down the motorway and join a thousand other souls, some of whom are collecting gifts sent to them last October.

    Of course, no Argentine paper chase is free of charge, I knew that anyway as I handed over my $40, which I was told, was to cover admin costs for handling my parcel.

    Yeah, right.

    Miraculously, my number was called almost immediately and I was ushered forth through the secret door leading to the hallowed customs area, whereupon a man dressed as a scientist placed a parcel in front of me, opened it with a sharp knife and asked me if I was satisfied that the contents were indeed what I was expecting.

    So, just as well it wasn’t a fucking vibrator for my girlfriend then?

    At which I say to the scientist “This is one of the most bizarre experiences I’ve had in my entire life, you know”, and as soon as the words came out of mouth, I knew it was a path to nowhere, but you’ve got to try haven’t you?

    With that, and in perfect English, he replied ‘Well, that’s the way it is’, without a hint of empathy whatsoever.

    Yes, quite. That’s exactly the way it is and sadly, I now expect nothing more and nothing less from state employees.

    On leaving the sanctified and highly secret customs area I then had to check out through a security area and sign my name once again for a parcel that should have been in my hot sticky hands some six months previously, without having money extorted out of me, without the ignominy of having the contents opened in front of others as if I were a delinquent convict, without having to spend half a day travelling to God knows where, without spending my hard earned cash on petrol the price of aviation fuel and without having to justify to this corrupt and mendacious government why I should have the brazen temerity to expect the civil right of receiving an item in the post which, in any other sane country would happen in the blink of an eye.

    And so, on firing up the bike, I took a look back at hangar number 3, gave it a "fuck you!" and burned some rubber in a generally easterly direction, hoping it would be the last brain numbing exercise I would have to go through and knowing that it wouldn't be.

    No photo description available.

  • We are laughing so hard we’re hurting ourselves, because of your graphic retelling, Splinter , but are certainly sympathetic.


    We hope that the epilogue didn’t include your sitting on the glasses upon your return home.

  • My only experience put me off ever ordering anything ever again....and that was back in the day when it was supposed to be a simple process. :rolleyes: