Trees and plants

  • The Tipa tree or Rosewood weeps small droplets which I always thought was condensation. But in fact it's caused by the Spittlebug and only occurs in the spring, apparently.

    There are loads of these trees all over Palermo and also on Libertador in Martinez and Acassuso, so when you park your car under one, it will soon be covered by a film of the droplets.

    I have no idea if it's toxic, either, but I now close my visor when riding under them.


    Here's a nice blog on the trees of Buenos Aires.

  • My husband was just telling me it was bug piss, as we were being sprayed over from atop while walking in Palermo Chico.

    I don't think it is toxic, but I don't fancy the idea to have bug spit in my hair and eyes, either!

  • We had a bad case of this last week in the garden although it was on the wisteria.....if it's the same insect that's causing it. If you look up you should see patches of foam. I got several large drops on my head and nothing has happened....I was kind of hoping it would be an undiscovered miracle cure for thinning hair.


  • Nasturtiums grow like weeds just across the road, but they don't like being transplanted very much. I managed to coax this one back to life after several larger ones simply faded away.

    You done well as they're not really meant to be transplanted. They're just treated like annuals back in the UK. Easy peasy from seed so just nab some next time you're passing.

  • Yes as are the leaves.

    Since you live in the countryside, what kind of herbs/plants do you eat?

    When I was a kid, my grandfather, who survived WWII, used to take me to the countryside to harvest plants to be eaten as salad or boiled. Some were bitter and he said they were good for digestion. I remember harvesting dandelion leaves but I don't recall the others, which were simply called 'countryside herbs'

  • Since you live in the countryside, what kind of herbs/plants do you eat?

    When I was a kid, my grandfather, who survived WWII, used to take me to the countryside to harvest plants to be eaten as salad or boiled. Some were bitter and he said they were good for digestion. I remember harvesting dandelion leaves but I don't recall the others, which were simply called 'countryside herbs'

    Although we have a quinta we don't live in the countryside. It's not my cup of tea to be honest...far too flat and boring and the dirt roads when wet don't help.

    To be honest from what I've learnt there isn't a hell of a lot of plantlife worth foraging for where we are....the missus would have picked it by now if there was. The only wild thing I've bothered to pick and eat has been 'mora' fruit. Better known in the UK as mulberry. It's very commonly found growing wild where we are. The darker fruit is sweeter than the white and makes good jam.