Whoever designed these monstrosities in 9 de Julio?

There are 10 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by Carlos.

  • Mobile video surveillance towers that could have come straight from the video game, Half Life 2 have been erected in Avenida 9 de Julio and one wonders if the designers were having a joke over a few beers.

    Hideous is one word that springs to mind.



    Half Life 2




  • There is plenty of them in Mar del Plata, just for the summer season. They appears around Christmas and are moved to storage in March.

    They overlook the boulevard maritimo, the beaches, some large squares, etc.


    I have seen them since at least 2 years, if not three.

  • I hope the ones on Avenida 9 de Julio are removed rather than left there permanently. What is the purpose of these awful things vs a simple video camera on a high pole?

  • The sense of urban beauty has disappeared. What is the use of those Neo constructivist forms, ot of place and of time?

    It is a contradiction with the care that the present CABA's goverment has regarding the public space, which in my point of view had improved very well since 10 years ago.

    Yesterday I made a walk through Barracas, a degraded borough, and I was surprised by the beauty of its parks, recently renewed.

  • And after a few months of wear, it could resemble the weathered stone of antiquity.

    The pity is that the current rubbish containers are plastic made. Plastic is very vulnerable to sun rays, they will be destroyed quickly, however the scattered pieces will remain for thousand of years. At least, metal is much more "ecological" material. Rust destroys them and helps to the vegetal earth to grow.

  • It would be far too expensive to make rubbish containers from metal, surely? Not to mention, far too heavy.

    Yes, I agree with your observation. But plastics is today a strong threat for ecology.

    Perhaps, to be frank, I am jealous of all plastic products. My father have had a tinplate can factory, and we dismantled it because of lack of clients. We purchase tinplate in England and we made the conic cans for corned beef, a good business in WWII. But you must regognize that no one in this country is recycling millions of coke and water bottles made of plastic. And plastic will endure millions of years. Metal cans, instead, destroys themselves by rust, in a few months and returns to earth, adding iron as a compost.