Living Together Before Marriage Still Illegal In 4 U.S. States

There are 13 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by Rice.

  • As it currently stands, Mississippi, Michigan, Florida, and Virginia currently have laws on the books banning cohabitation. For instance, in Virginia, it is a misdemeanor for “any persons, not married to each other, [to] lewdly and lasciviously associate and cohabit together” and is punishable by up to a $500 fine for the first offense (a second conviction could potentially land you up to a year in the slammer and a $2,500 fine). The legal language and penalties are similar in the other mentioned states, except Mississippi, where the law bans “unlawful cohabitation” in which a man and women live together and it can be proven that they had “habitual sexual intercourse.”


    You might be thinking, “but surely these laws are no longer enforced, right?” Not necessarily.

  • I'm lewd, lascivious and proud!

    They do have some strange laws in the US. I mean, you can't drink until you're 21 (and even this is confusing) , but you can vote and buy a gun at 18.

    Mind you, here are a few weird ones from my country:


    In Chester, its legal to shoot a Welsh person with a bow and arrow inside city walls after midnight. In Hereford, you may not shoot a Welsh person on Sunday with a longbow in the Cathedral Close.


    In York, excluding Sundays, it is perfectly legal to shoot a Scotsman with a bow and arrow. ...

    Regardless of any ancient legislation, the Law Commission said: "It is illegal to shoot a Welsh or Scottish (or any other) person regardless of the day, location or choice of weaponry."

  • I love reading these archaic laws, though it is completely inconceivable that they still exist.


    serafina , because we often seem to find ourselves in Michigan and Mississippi (though not Florida or Virginia, thank God), we decided tonight that we need to be careful not to lose our marriage license if we want to stay out of prison.

  • I love reading these archaic laws, though it is completely inconceivable that they still exist.


    serafina , because we often seem to find ourselves in Michigan and Mississippi (though not Florida or Virginia, thank God), we decided tonight that we need to be careful not to lose our marriage license if we want to stay out of prison.

    And always remember to carry a Valid and Current Passport!


    That may - on the surface - appear to be some "whim" or foolish opinion of an "old coot" (yes, called that to my face - but that hasn't been the worse "comment");

    but the truth of the matter is, anything less than having a valid, legal, and current passport while traveling in the United States is potentially running the risk of spending 24 hours in "detention" at best; or worse, ending up in some "incarceration cell" for an extended "stay".


    A case in point:

    Any state Drivers License ID - which many travelers in the past in the U.S. relied on as a "valid ID" to allow for boarding air passenger flights - is no longer considered a valid and legal REQUIRED ID at airports in the U.S.


    In most states of the U.S., anything less than a Passport is NOT accepted for air travel - even IF your plans for travel DO NOT have an out of the country destination.

    By no later than January 1, 2020, EVERY state will require a valid passport for ANY air travel.

    [In case there are those of who doubt this, the aforementioned acquired information was derived directly from a major air transportation service counter at an International Air Port in western United States.]

  • CruiseJunki , according to the Transportation Safety Administration’s site, “Beginning Oct. 1, 2020, if you plan to use your state-issued ID or license to fly within the U.S., make sure it is REAL ID compliant. If you are not sure if your ID complies with REAL ID, check with your state department of motor vehicles.”


    Over the past several years, states have been changing their drivers’ licenses to become “Real ID Compliant.” FAQ’s can be found at https://www.dhs.gov/real-id-public-faqs.

  • CruiseJunki , according to the Transportation Safety Administration’s site, “Beginning Oct. 1, 2020, if you plan to use your state-issued ID or license to fly within the U.S., make sure it is REAL ID compliant. If you are not sure if your ID complies with REAL ID, check with your state department of motor vehicles.”


    Over the past several years, states have been changing their drivers’ licenses to become “Real ID Compliant.” FAQ’s can be found at https://www.dhs.gov/real-id-public-faqs.

    I checked out your response with United Airlines.


    According to personnel at the United Airlines Desk, International Airport, Reno, Nevada, the Nevada Drivers License designated as Real ID (there are other versions of this name depending upon which state one's Drivers License is issued from) is NOT sufficient for air flights which depart from a U.S. Airport but which are scheduled to include a departure for a designation outside of the United States after having made a stop within the U.S.


    Additionally, it is up to the particular Airlines the passenger is booking a flight on, as to whether or not additional current and valid photo ID is required

    from the passenger/s. In such a case then, a valid and current U.S. Passport is therefore required.


    I asked WHY such a "broad" interpretation of the "rules" can be applied by authorized personnel.

    Their response:

    Because, if for some unknown/unexpected reason a particular air flight became necessary to include a change in flight plans, e.g., that the pilots on the aircraft in flight (or from ground authorized personnel) deemed it necessary to fly to another arrival point for safety reasons or for something else equally crucial to the safety of all passengers on board, and which therefore had an "adjusted" designation point which is out of the United States, it could be reasoned that the "arrival"

    of passengers in a foreign country without a valid U.S. Passport on their person ......... their safety could possibly be compromised.


    CRUISE TRAVEL:

    Because I plan to take a cruise this Fall which will be on a cruise ship which departs from Canada, but arrives at a U.S. Port at the end of the journey,

    a valid, current U.S. Passport is required. State issued Photo ID's (including any and all photo ID Drivers License regardless of TYPE) are NOT sufficient for travel on a cruise ship. There are NO exceptions.


    Additional info

    I forgot to include this important information: Regarding Cruise Travel, IF cruise travel a U.S. Citizen takes is totally within the United States - as to embarkation and disembarkation - then it is possible to travel on such cruise without a U.S. Passport. However, it is not advised that a U.S. Citizen travel on any cruise ship without a valid Passport.


    Also: If the cruise ship one is traveling on, begins in the U.S. and also ends in the U.S., BUT TRAVELS WITHIN THE LEGAL BOUNDARIES OR JURISDICTION OF A COUNTRY NOT OF THE UNITED STATES BEFORE THE CRUISE SHIP REACHES ITS DISEMBARKATION POINT, the U.S. passenger/s on board MUST have a valid and current U.S. Passport.

    Edited 4 times, last by CruiseJunki: Additional information was added; edited for grammar and punctuation errors ().

  • I am in Mar del Plata for the summer and I along the coast (from Pinamar downward) there are mobile trucks to get an expedited plastic DNI. And they are useful to many as I see people at all hours getting in and asking for information.
    Despite the deadline to switch to the plastic DNI has been moved several times, apparently a considerable share of the population totally missed these notices.





    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  • I can travel to Uruguay on just my DNI, apparently. However, I'd take my passport anyway, because of Murphy's Law.

    In 2017 when we travelled to the UK out of Ezeiza, I was using a brand new passport for the first time and was pulled up by check-in, since the passport had no entry stamps. Fortunately I'd taken my old passport as well, just in case.

    That could have been a shit storm.

  • We always carry our last one too. It has the Argentine entrance visa required of US travelers after President Bush imposed one on Argentina in the early teens, maybe? Then relaxed a few years later.

  • The current authorities will not put any complication for the tourists. We need them, and it will be nonsense to restrain its arrival.

    If I were the government, I will extend the waiver for a tourist visa for 6 months, more than now.

    We have a good opportunities to the retirees from the USA; they do not like the northern cold, so they came here and stay in Bariloche or other nice sites, an entire season.