A no-deal Brexit may be on the cards

  • With MPs due to vote on Teresa May's deal on Tuesday, it's widely expected that this will be a NO vote, which would have serious consequences.

    Here's a guide from the BBC:


    Quick guide: What is a no-deal Brexit?

    A "no-deal" Brexit is where the UK would cut all ties with the European Union overnight.

    Theresa May's government, and many others, believe this would be hugely damaging and want a more gradual withdrawal. But if Parliament can't agree on that, and nothing else takes its place, the UK will leave without a deal.

    This would mean the UK would not have to obey EU rules. Instead, it would need to follow World Trade Organization terms on trade. Many businesses would see new taxes on imports, exports and services, which are likely to increase their operating costs. That means the prices of some goods in UK shops could go up.

    The UK would also lose the trade agreements it had with other countries as a member of the EU, all of which would need to be renegotiated alongside the new agreement with the EU itself.

    Manufacturers in the UK expect to face delays in components coming across the border.

    The UK would be free to set its own immigration controls. However some UK professionals working in the EU and UK expats could face uncertainty until their status was clarified. The European Commission has said that even in a no-deal scenario, UK travellers won't need a visa for short visits of up to 90 days.

    The border between Northern Ireland and the Irish republic would become an external frontier for the EU with customs and immigration controls, though how and where any checks would be made is not clear.

    Some Leave supporters think that leaving without a deal would be positive if the right preparations were made. They say criticism is scaremongering and any short term pain would be for long term gain.

    But critics - including both Brexit supporters and opponents - say that leaving without a deal would be a disaster for the UK: driving up food prices, leading to shortages of goods and gridlock on some roads in the South East resulting from extra border checks.



  • The UK transport minister Chris Grayling, has awarded a £13.8 million contract to a two year old start up company, Seaborne Freight, to run roll on/roll off ferry services between Ramsgate, Kent and Ostend, Belgium.

    The curious thing about this contract is that Seaborne have no vessels, no real trading history, one of their directors was imprisoned for two months for possession of a shotgun (according to Wikipedia) and the company's chief executive, Ben Sharp, previously ran Mercator, a ship chartering business, that was forced into liquidation following court petitions from HM Revenue and Customs. The amount of unpaid tax was not stated, but the former company had a total of £1.78m in unpaid debts.

    Until recently, the company's terms and conditions on their website appeared to have been copied and pasted from a fast food joint -“It is the responsibility of the customer to thoroughly check the supplied goods before agreeing to pay for any meal/order.”

    Furthermore, no due diligence was carried out and the government didn't put the contract out to public tender, as is normally the case. Apparently they cited this as being an emergency situation due to the Brexit situation.

    It also transpires that the company has no actual premises listed and the address shown on its website appears to be a holding address for a group of lawyers

    There's a huge action group post which you can find on Facebook here.

    Very shady indeed.

  • That young lady is impressive. Is she is longing for an independent Scotland?

    My knowledge of British politics is very weak, but I can see a sharp criticism when she highlights the virtues of the Scots.

    May I ask the counsel or the explanation of some member of this forum with a clear understanding of what is going on?

  • That young lady is impressive. Is she is longing for an independent Scotland?

    My knowledge of British politics is very weak, but I can see a sharp criticism when she highlights the virtues of the Scots.

    May I ask the counsel or the explanation of some member of this forum with a clear understanding of what is going on?

    The big problem Carlos is that no one really knows what is happening.


    I talk to friends in the UK and they don't know either.


    Its a bloody mess and I am not sure how it will all end.

  • Thank you for your answer. After all, in the medieval times Scotland was a completely independent country, even at the times of King Alfred the great, who envisioned the union of all peoples of Great Britain.

    Even they did not accepted the Anglican Christian branch: they are Presbyterians, as far as I know.

    Here in BA in the 1825's we have had only 2 protestant communities: The Anglican for the English and the Presbyterian for the Scots, all of them with magnificent churches that now are National Monuments of Argentina.

  • The New York Times reports “Ina worst-case scenario, the Bank of England calculated in November that Brexit could shrink the economy by 8 percent and send house prices plunging by 30 percent.”


    Think about that.

  • Given the size of the Conservative majority it was never going to be straightforward.


    Simon Cowell should host a special version of Britain's Got Talent for those Members of Parliament who are using the opportunity to gain publicity for themselves.


    Britain have nothing to fear no matter what deal they end up with.

  • Given the size of the Conservative majority it was never going to be straightforward.


    Simon Cowell should host a special version of Britain's Got Talent for those Members of Parliament who are using the opportunity to gain publicity for themselves.


    Britain have nothing to fear no matter what deal they end up with.

    This could indeed be the answer, UK Man . I wonder which MP could be the next Susan Doyle?

  • A new political party has now been formed in the UK.

    The Independent Group now has three women from the Conservative party and eight from Labour, thus putting them equal in seats to the Lib Dems.

    They all resigned from their respective parties because of the dire Brexit situation and i would expect a few more resignations before the end of March, aka The Ides of March.